In the December issue of
Colorado Central Magazine

A lithograph of Poncha Springs, Colorado in 1892. Read about the early settlement of Italian immigrants to the town in our December print issue. (Courtesy of the Salida Library)
A lithograph of Poncha Springs, Colorado in 1892. Read about the early settlement of Italian immigrants to the town in our December print issue. (Courtesy of the Salida Library)

Private Property: Mt. Shavano Summit Riddled with Mining Claims

By Maisie Ramsay

Photo by Mike Rosso

The entire summit of Mount Shavano, in the Sawatch Range, is located on private property, but not of the “trespassers will be shot” variety.
There are no fences. There are no signs. Save for a cairn and a couple of weather-beaten survey posts, there’s nothing to indicate that the entire summit block is composed of private mining claims – except, perhaps, the poor condition of the trail.
Private, high-elevation mining claims have precluded the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) from restoring the path to Shavano’s summit, leaving the route to degrade steadily with each passing year.
The Colorado Fourteeners Initiative (CFI) has come up with a novel solution to this problem: buy the mining claims and give them to the Forest Service. Read more

The Real Deal Music Review: SHEL Just Crazy Enough

By Brian Rill

shel-just-crazy-enoughThe 19th century philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche prefaced his book The Will To Powerwith this line, “Of what is great one must either be silent or speak with greatness, that means cynically and with innocence.” I will attempt to relate honestly the virtue of music amidst my own opinions in order to set free for the listener the product’s appeal and cultural relevance. Discovering pathos within modernity can be a difficult task, but within the right hymns sometimes there are steps that lead us to hope. Not outside the advent of SHEL’s present work lives this new faith. Read more

 

Water Update

By John Orr

November Election Recap

Normally this column deals with water issues and water folks in Central Colorado, but in the aftermath of the weirdest election season in my lifetime this iteration will take on a statewide and national flavor.

Del Norte rancher Travis Smith, currently serving on the Colorado Water Conservation Board, likes to remind folks in the water business, that “We are more connected than we’d like to admit.”

With all the uncertainty before us, is it possible to glean some idea of the effects the voters have wrought upon themselves?

President-elect Trump is rumored to be about to install a non-scientist, Myron Ebell, as the head of the Environmental Protection Agency. Mr. Ebell has spoken out against the “hoax” of global warming, and many hail his ascension as necessary to clip the wings of a federal government run wild under President Obama. Read more