The Caboose

By Forrest Whitman There’s shock in Colorado at the real prospect of losing the popular passenger train, the Chief. The rumors out of AMTRAK all say the Chief is in a railroad death spiral. The new President of AMTRAK, Richard Anderson, runs AMTRAK like President Trump runs the White House. There’s no public input or […]

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Museums of Central Colorado: Buena Vista Heritage

By Kiki Lathrop Buena Vista is a town steeped in stories, memories and lore. The 139-year-old town has seen its share of the “Wild West” and has watched it be tamed to what it is today. The feeling of walking back in time while visiting downtown draws crowds from around the world. None so much […]

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Quillen’s Corner: Can We Fix What Happened Yesterday?

By Martha Quillen After Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain committed suicide, news sources focused on our nation’s escalating suicide rate, and some concluded our entire society is sick. But that’s hardly a novel idea in our era of school shootings, factionalism, and increased levels of opioid addiction, obesity, suicide, inequality and scandals that reveal sexist […]

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A Pyrrhic Victory?

By Hal Walter When we last left off in the continuing saga of our efforts to get Harrison on Medicaid coverage through the Children’s Extended Support (CES) Waiver, his application had been denied by the state, and I was determined to raise hell about it. As background, Harrison is diagnosed with autism and ADHD, and […]

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Down on the Ground with the Troubled Trees

By George Sibley The onset of the wildfire season puts our forests back on the front page, but the wildfires are really just a visible symptom of larger troubles among the trees – troubles that track those “natural disasters” right back to us humans and some naive cultural choices.

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Places – Iris: A Very Remote Ghost Town

Article, photo and map by Kenneth Jessen Iris, located in the northern part of Saguache County south of Gunnison, was one of the most remote ghost towns in the state. Until recently, the roads into the area were private, gated and posted. New home construction west of the site has opened up the area to […]

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Ski Hi: Colorado’s Oldest Pro Rodeo

By Anthony Guerrero The oldest professional rodeo in Colorado is held every summer in Monte Vista in the San Luis Valley. Started in 1919, it is a deep Valley tradition having been held every year since, except for two years during World War II.

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Dispatch From The Edge

By Peter Anderson It is hard enough to explain the game to someone who does not know it. It is even harder for them to understand why you love baseball enough to watch it. It is soooo slowwww, they say, and they are right, but for me anyway, that is part of the game’s appeal. […]

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Book Review: Bricks Underneath A Hoop Skirt

By Carolyn White Liferich Publishing 2018 ISB 978-1-4897-1637-8(sc) 101 pages Reviewed by Forrest Whitman When I picked up this book I was immediately skeptical. A book about a young woman working with horses in the backcountry sounded like another “girl meets horse” story. Not so this one. White has an understated, sometimes tongue-in-cheek, style. Her […]

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Rehabilitating a Homicidal Pet

By Jane Parnell Several months before having my right knee replaced, I adopted a puppy, my first ever. I purchased her from a rescue organization that specializes in stray dogs on the Navajo Reservation. She was seven weeks old. They said she was a husky-German shepherd like my previous dog, a stray I rescued myself […]

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The Natural World: Mantids

By Tina Mitchell Mantids (for instance, the “praying mantis”) are some of the most distinctive and well-recognized of all the insect groups. The front prey-grasping legs capture everyone’s attention when they spot a mantid. The top of the thorax (the prothorax) is very elongated to support these prominent forelegs. Mantids have excellent vision, with the […]

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Eye on the 5th

By Daniel Smith By the time you read this, the results of the state’s open primary election will be known and the armchair political quarterbacks will have aired their opinion, critics will have done their finger-pointing and griping about who lost and why – and the electorate will have had their say about who makes […]

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Flashback: 20 Years Ago in Colorado Central Magazine

Waste It To Save Your Community Essay by Ed Quillen, July 1998 IN THE REST of the temperate world, “spring” means a season of blossoms, greenery and gentle showers. Here in the mountains, it means wind or blistering heat alternating with blizzards – often within the hour, accompanied by landslips and rockslides.

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The Memory Project: Portraits of Syria

By Ann Marie Swan Photos by Janine Frazee   In late spring, my 15-year-old daughter, Ella, sat at our kitchen table, drawing a portrait of a 10-year-old Syrian girl from a photo. Then she erased away hours of her work. “Her eyes,” Ella said, and gently blew the debris from the page. “I just can’t […]

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