Quillen’s Corner: Establishing an America for Liberty, Justice and The People

By Martha Quillen For years now, the media and Pew Research reports have indicated Americans are growing increasingly partisan, which is generally characterized as a bad thing, and has been credited with spurring extremism, gridlock, Congressional ineffectiveness and politically motivated violence. But what shocks me in recent years is not the national news; it’s how […]

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Down on the Ground with Springtime in the Rockies

By George Sibley It’s only the ides of March as I write this, but it’s already springtime in this part of the Rockies. I know that because right now it feels like January outside, with snow pellets – nasty little dry lumps, no art to them at all – moving through, too horizontally to imagine […]

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A Farmer Far Afield: A Duck’s Life

By John Mattingly Ducks are smart, capable of deductive reasoning, with an intelligence quotient equal to donkeys. Many are surprised by this, but it is worth remembering that mammals with four legs require a lot of brain space to regulate locomotion, whereas ducks have no complicated considerations when it comes to gliding effortlessly across water. […]

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Places: Bishop Castle

By Elliott Jackson I’ve only visited Bishop Castle a couple times in waking life, but in my dreams I have found myself wandering round it more than once, like an addled ghost looking for the Mortal Coil’s exit sign. One time, the dragon’s head which adorns the Castle’s topmost battlements came to life as an […]

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Book Review: Frontier Colorado Gunfights

Frontier Colorado Gunfights True Stories of Outlaws and Lawmen in the American West by Kenneth Jessen J V Publications, 260 pages ISBN 978-1-928656-12-8 Reviewed by Forrest Whitman Readers of this publication have come to expect careful and detailed historical writing from Kenneth Jessen. His new book lives up to that standard. Jessen describes gunfights and […]

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The Crowded Acre: Cats and Taxes

By Jen Welch When I was about five years old, I remember nervously asking my mom about taxes. I was concerned that I wouldn’t know when to pay or how much I owed. Add to that the fact that there were multiple types of taxes, varying tax rates and several tax collection entities to make […]

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Eye on the 5th

By Daniel Smith Despite reportedly strong caucus turnouts in the district, nothing is very clear yet on the strength of the various candidates running for the Fifth Congressional District seat.

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Top 10 Worst Ghost Towns in Colorado: Part Two

By Jan MacKell Collins Elkton – Boom and Bust Named for the nearby Elkton Mine in 1894, this town in the world-famous Cripple Creek District once had a population of 2,500 people. All three railroads of the District once served Elkton, and a special siding was constructed for the sole purpose of transporting gold ore […]

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From the Editor: Tales of the Cult

By Mike Rosso Last night I began watching the Netflix series Wild Wild Country, a six-part documentary on the Rajneesh commune in rural Oregon in the early 1980s. This story has fascinated me since those early days as I had a friend in Durango who fell in love with a member of that cult, began […]

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The Rugged, Figurative Terrain of Deep Sport

By Hal Walter For the past couple of years I have been at least partially absorbed by the concept of something called “Deep Sport.” The notion stems from Deep Ecology – explored by the poet-essayist Gary Snyder – which speaks to the inherent worth and value of all living beings beyond their perceived value to […]

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About the Cover Photographer: David Sorensen

By David Sorensen David Sorensen migrated with his family from the Netherlands to the San Luis Valley, Colorado in 2016. They have a dream of living in the beauty of God’s creation. As a nature photographer, David has found that the beauty of nature has a healing effect on people. Nature’s beauty gives us a […]

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Dispatch from the Edge

By Peter Anderson All winter long, this lingering dissonance: I say “beautiful day,” and the blue sky mildness is real and pleasant enough, but so is the uneasy notion that our good fortune now will cost us come summer. The weather “pleasantries” we exchange carry only half of the truth. The other half, too unsettling […]

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