It’s 2018 and the Struggle Continues

By Martha Quillen I never believed in the possibility of universal peace and understanding, but I went to college in the late 1960s when students clamored for peace, equality, black rights, women’s rights, grape workers’ rights … And I believed things would improve. Fifty years later it’s clear that raging, marching, rioting, and otherwise flouting authority […]

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Down on the Ground with Two Americas

By George Sibley In the beginning all the world was America … – John Locke, 1689 That these United States are not very united today seems obvious. We’ve seen the red and blue map from the 2016 election: the blue urban islands that concentrate four fifths of the nation’s population, in a rural red sea […]

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Warm Winters

By John Mattingly The most common “thoughts and prayers” during an unseasonably warm winter are mixed between taking advantage of the warm weather and the perennial concern in the West for snowpack and water supply. Having farmed for over forty years, I’ve spent most of my life outside, where luck and livelihood depended on the […]

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The Homelake Veterans History Center Museum

By Jane Rhett Homelake Veterans History Center Museum is located on the site of the Colorado Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Home, now the Colorado State Veterans Center at Homelake just east of Monte Vista in the San Luis Valley. The Home was established in 1889 at the behest of the GAR (Grand Army of the Republic) […]

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Book review: Manyhorses Traveling

Manyhorses Traveling By Diane Sawatzki Palmer Divide Productions Paper 223 pp $14.00/Kindle $4.95 Reviewed by Annie Dawid Manyhorses Traveling begins just as the narrative of Diane Sawatzki’s previous book, Once Upon Another Time (2012) ends. The new novel can stand on its own, but provides more pleasure as a sequel to the first book. Both […]

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Top 10 Worst Ghost Towns in Colorado: Part One

By Kenneth Jessen Editor’s note: Salida’s been making quite a few top 10 “Best Town” lists over the past few years, much to the chagrin of a few locals. We thought it would be fun to turn the table and list the worst Colorado towns of 100 years ago. We’ve listed them as worst for […]

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Big Project

By Mike Rosso In January 2017, I left the country and spent almost two weeks exploring parts of Guatemala. Being away from the U.S., as well as being a minority with a very limited knowledge of the local language, is always humbling but very gratifying. I love seeing how folks in other cultures interact and […]

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About the Cover Photograph

This group photo of gold miners in front of a large log cabin near the town of Granite, Colorado, shows horses, a wagon, and a miner sitting on a Kuner Pickle Company barrel. It was taken between 1890 and 1900 by Charles W. (C.W.) Erdlen (1857-1935) and was provided to us by the Western History […]

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At What Cost?

By Hal Walter I’ve followed with keen interest a case in which parents sued Colorado’s Douglas County School District to pay tuition after pulling their autistic son from the public system and placing him in a $70,000-per-year private school for special-needs kids. The parents claimed the district did not provide adequate education for their child, […]

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Keeping Online – Colorado Central Telecom

By Mike Rosso It was over a decade into the 21st century and the town of Crestone was struggling to keep up with the modern era. At a time when most of the urban United States, as well as many rural communities were becoming more and more dependent on the internet for work, news, commerce, […]

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Eye on the Fifth

By Daniel Smith The political season usually gets in gear in March of election years with local caucuses, district and state assemblies as well as primary balloting to determine who gets on the November election ballot. In the Fifth Congressional District, thus far there are three Democrats and three Republicans lined up to challenge Republican […]

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Cañon City’s Famous Dinosaur

By Virginia McConnell Simmons Meet Stegosaurus stenops, Colorado’s state fossil. The local popularity of dinosaurs is evident at Cañon City, where prison inmates created a large model of a Stegosaurus several years ago. It became a familiar mascot, once seen on the east side of town and later moved to the Fremont Campus of Pueblo […]

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