Convicts built many state highways

Brief by Central Staff Transportation History – January 1999 – Colorado Central Magazine Ca├▒on City contributed much, in both labor and materials, to early highway construction in Colorado. The labor came from convicts at the state penitentiary, who were put to work on roads from 1905 until 1926, when the practice was abolished. The materials […]

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How US 50 came to pass through Central Colorado

Article by Alvin Edlund, Jr. Transportation History – January 1999 – Colorado Central Magazine ONE OF THE LONGEST HIGHWAYS in the United States is Highway 50, which stretches from Ocean City, Maryland, to Sacramento, California, and passes through Washington D.C., Cincinnati, St. Louis, Kansas City, Carson City, Lake Tahoe, and Central Colorado. A sign at […]

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The Union Pacific has been here and done that

Brief by Central Staff Transportation History – October 1996 – Colorado Central Magazine On Sept. 12, the Union Pacific began its takeover of the Southern Pacific, and so the trains that rattle through here (until they manage to abandon the Tennessee Pass line) will be UP trains. The UP has been here before, though. The […]

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How to help restore the tunnel approach

Sidebar by Kym O’Connell-Todd Transportation History – July 1994 – Colorado Central Magazines. Anyone who is interested in the restoration of the Alpine Tunnel and can offer the following help should call Ray Rossman at the Gunnison Forest Service office at 303-641-0471:

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Tunnel delays made DSP&P lose the race to Gunnison

Sidebar by Kym O’Connell-Todd Transportation History – July 1994 – Colorado Central Magazine Enthusiasm was high — the tension even greater — during the rail race of 1879. Two narrow-gauge railroad companies, the Denver and Rio Grande (D&RG) Railroad and the Denver South Park and Pacific Railroad (DSP&P), fought neck to neck to reach the […]

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West Portal of Alpine Tunnel getting a facelift

Article by Kym O’Connell-Todd Transportation History – July 1994 – Colorado Central Magazine At a little more than 11,500 feet above the tides, a small wooden building leans into whistling tundra wind. Abandoned for many years and left as a makeshift home to marmots and other mountaintop squatters, the little depot still shares the snow-patched […]

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