George Sibley: Down on the Ground in Central Colorado

I’ve been trying to figure out how and where Central Colorado – the region served (and somewhat created) by this magazine – fits into last month’s topic, “Great Divide” political geography. The Great Divide being not the physical Continental Divide but the demographic metropolitan-nonmetropolitan divide, a major factor in the 2016 election.

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George Sibley: Down on the Ground with Old Movies

I know this is the music issue, but there are a lot of other things kicking around in my mind these days. So my musical focus for this column is going to be short and sweet. Last week, Netflix failed us one night, so my partner Maryo and I watched Casablanca for about the fifth […]

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George Sibley: Down on the Ground Trumped and Stumped

Things may be settling out a bit by the time you read this. All the cheers and jeers over the election, the anger in “Not My President” and “Build The Wall” rallies here and there, the stock market rollercoaster, the warnings and pleas from leaders around the world, and so on. All of that now […]

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George Sibley: Down on the Ground with Democracy Again

By George Sibley Trying to reduce the personal library a while back, I came across a book titled The Irony of Democracy: An Uncommon Introduction to American Politics. I have no idea where I got it – probably some yard sale – and don’t remember ever opening it. By the reduction standards I’ve set, it […]

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Down on the Ground with the Hotshots

By George Sibley I should probably be trying to write something wonky about American politics, but instead I’m writing this article from the near-wilds on the sunny side of Grand Mesa, at a rendezvous of an organization formerly known as the Crested Butte Hotshots. The Hotshots were a forest-fire crew based in Crested Butte who […]

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Down on the Ground across the Greater Divide

By George Sibley Colorado has now had a state water plan long enough (half a year) for critical commentary to crank up. The main criticism seems to be that the water plan is “not a plan at all, but just a lot of ideas and suggestions” for better water use. The critics seem to want […]

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Down on the Ground in Colorado

By George Sibley I’ve been trying to figure out Colorado. I’m always a little irritated when I’m driving through the Upper Arkansas Valley, on my way to the Upper Gunnison, and I see one of those signs: “Now this is Colorado.” Sez who? And is my Upper Gunnison also “really Colorado” even though it is […]

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Down on the Ground with the Garden

By George Sibley May and June are dominated here by the garden. Gardens, I should say; when we moved into our Gunnison home 20-some years ago, we were unimpressed with the expanse of bad lawn that came with it, and we resolved to annually convert 50 square feet of bad lawn to garden space. I lack […]

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George Sibley: Down on the Ground with Groundwater

Water again. Just can’t get away from the stuff – literally can’t, I guess, being myself about 70 percent just water that learned how to stand up and look around. What’s caught my attention this month is a new study from the U.S. Geological Survey, finding that more of the water in the Upper Colorado […]

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Down on the Ground Reviewing the 20th Century

By George Sibley I sometimes sort of joke, in these pages and elsewhere, about the 21st century, wondering in 2016 if we will ever get to the 21st century, and what it will be like if we do. I do argue – seriously, not jokingly – that “a new century” will not really begin until […]

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Down on the Ground with Our Land

By George Sibley “Creative destruction” is a term we’re most familiar with in the context of capitalist economics: the restless flow and ebb of capital in its often mindless, generally heartless, search for The Next Big Thing – steam abandoned for internal combustion, coal yielding to natural gas yielding to solar, typewriters losing to computers, […]

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Down on the Ground Counting Blessings

By George Sibley It was a moderately surreal event: 80 people gathered on top of Monarch Pass on the Continental Divide in early January (sunny, temperature 9 degrees), around an altar carved out of the deep snowbanks, on which were arranged icons of the Eastern Orthodox Church.

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Down on the Ground with the Next Generation

By George Sibley I got talked into revisiting my checkered past as an instructor at Western Colorado State University this fall; the Environment and Sustainability program needed a class covered, and asked if I would conduct a seminar on Western water. So I cobbled up a seminar titled “The Colorado River in the Anthropocene.”

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