Of mountain names and hay

Letter from Slim Wolfe Geography – September 2008 – Colorado Central Magazine Editors: Talk about making a mountain out of a molehill…. Plainly, the mountain doesn’t give a hoot what you call it or who gets the credit, nor do dead soldiers seem likely to take offense, however, the backers of this presumptuous KIAMIA notion […]

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Developments on KIA/MIA

Letter from Bruce Salisbury Geography – September 2008 – Colorado Central Magazine Editors: On the 6th of August a small group of us gathered at Mount KIA/MIA. Royce and Barry Raven, and Barry’s wife Raman came there to climb the mountain for all the KIA/MIA, and to determine a best route and to take photos […]

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From Kit Carson to Tranquility?

Brief by Central Staff Geography – August 2008 – Colorado Central Magazine According to one of our favorite books of mountain lore (A Climbing Guide to Colorado’s Fourteeners, by Walter R. Borneman and Lyndon J. Lampert), there has always been some confusion about names for the peaks in the Sangre de Cristo range above the […]

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Mt. KIA/MIS is on the map

Brief by Central Staff Geography – November 2007 – Colorado Central Magazine A formerly nameless mountain in Saguache County is now Mt. KIA/MIA to honor American military personnel who were either “Killed In Action” (KIA) or “Missing In Action” (MIA). The peak is 11,293 feet high, and it rises along the divide between Silver and […]

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The most remote place in the 48 states

Brief by Allen Best Geography – June 2007 – Colorado Central Magazine Want to get away from it all? If remoteness is defined by the absence of roads, then Hinsdale County, located in Colorado’s San Juan Mountains, is the most remote place in the lower 48 states.

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A mountain to honor warriors

Brief by Central Staff Geography – March 2007 – Colorado Central Magazine There’s a proposal afoot to christen a heretofore nameless peak in Sagauche County; the suggested name is Mt. Kiamia. A more informative way to spell it would be Mt. KIA/MIA, as the idea is to honor American soldiers who were either Killed In […]

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A growth-control measure

Letter from Laird Campbell Geography – January 2007 – Colorado Central Magazine Editors: The Colorado map shows that Chaffee County has more 14,000-foot mountains than any other county in Colorado and probably more than anywhere else in the United States. From north to south they are: La Plata Peak, Huron Peak, Mt. Belford, Mt. Oxford, […]

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Shameless self-promotion

Letter from Harvey N. Gardiner Geography – December 2006 – Colorado Central Magazine Editors: I always find Colorado Central interesting reading. You may be surprised at the obscure things this reader, at least, notices, but which also give me the opportunity for shameless self-promotion.

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Where’s the High Desert?

Brief by Central Staff Geography – June 2006 – Colorado Central Magazine We sometimes explain Colorado Central as “the monthly magazine for America’s highest deserts,” but a recent excursion got us to wondering about high deserts. That’s because we visited the Museum of the High Desert just outside Bend, Ore. There, the “high desert” is […]

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Sewanee: An unrecognized Collegiate Peak

Article by Merritt R. Blakeslee Geography -April 2006 -Colorado Central Magazine IN 1949 TWO GEOLOGISTS in the Denver office of the U.S. Geological Survey were assigned the task of updating the geological description of that portion of Gunnison and Chaffee counties covered by the USGS Garfield Colorado 15-minute quadrangle. The geology of this area had […]

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Veta v. La Veta

Letter from Virginia McConnell Simmons Geography – April 2006 – Colorado Central Magazine Editors: Here is a small stick to throw onto the flickering flames about whether the original, narrow- gauge D&RG route crossed La Veta Pass or Veta Pass, and whether the later standard- gauge route crossed Veta Pass or La Veta Pass. Today […]

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Where’s the Front Range?

Letter from Roger Kirkpatrick Geography – January 2006 – Colorado Central Magazine Hi Ed, This is sort of a homeland question, did you move to Salida from the Front Range, as you state on page 45, or was it really the Great Plains? I suspect you grew up on the Great Plains and that you, […]

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How was Mt. White named?

Letter from Virginia McConnell Simmons Geography – August 2005 – Colorado Central Magazine Dear Ed and Martha, Since your publication of my article about the names of Mts. Shavano, Tabeguache, and Antero in Colorado Central (June 2005), I have been attempting to find an explanation for the name of Mt. White, an anomaly amongst those […]

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There’s another Pike’s Peak

Brief by Central Staff Geography – August 2005 – Colorado Central Magazine Next year marks the bicentennial of Lt. Zebulon Montgomery Pike’s 1806-07 expedition to Colorado, which included a Christmas camp near Salida and his capture by Spanish soldiers in the San Luis Valley. This bicentennial won’t get nearly the attention that the Lewis and […]

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Naming the Indian group of the Sawatch Range

Article by Virginia McConnell Simmons Geography – June 2005 – Colorado Central Magazine THE SAWATCH RANGE on the west side of Chaffee County is a visual knock-out, and the names of some of its peaks offer a reminder of the area’s past history. Among alien labels like Princeton and Harvard, a handful of mountains in […]

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