Gardening in Circles: Give Peas a Chance

By John Mattingly Shutting down a garden is like saying goodbye to a good old friend who visited for the summer, a friend who challenged you, fed you, worked you, taught you the upside of patience and sharpened your powers of observation and contemplation. You knew the friend had to leave, but in the course […]

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Down on the Ground with the Garden

By George Sibley May and June are dominated here by the garden. Gardens, I should say; when we moved into our Gunnison home 20-some years ago, we were unimpressed with the expanse of bad lawn that came with it, and we resolved to annually convert 50 square feet of bad lawn to garden space. I lack […]

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About the Cover Artist – Susan Spohn

Salida-based artist Susan Spohn describes herself as a gardener, recreating in paint the magic she feels when in the presence of flowers, critters and nature. Painting memories, visions and whimsy, her favorite medium is oil paint. She paints on wood panels using bristle brushes, painting knives, turpentine and varnish. Her paintings of textural garden scenes […]

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Down on the Ground – Working for Food

by George Sibley Will work for food: the garden season is upon us again. We’re learning that with a few wheelbarrows of compost, a few more of aged horse manure, and a lot of “Gunnison Gold” (an earthy mix of wood chips with sludge from the wastewater plant), all mixed and dug in with a […]

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From the Compost Bin – October 2009

(Tips for high-altitude gardeners) by Suzanne Ward We have moved into autumn and frost will be visiting our gardens.? It’s not yet time to put it all to rest – there’s still a little more work to be done before winter. ?When frost threatens, it is wise to be prepared.? The first frost is often […]

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From the Compost Bin – September 2009

(Tips for high-altitude gardeners) by Suzanne Ward By this time of year you will have been harvesting your garden produce throughout the summer and hopefully, not too soon nor too late. Harvest timing is learned by experience. It is determined by what tastes best to you. Sample your vegetable produce at various stages of ripeness […]

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From the Compost Bin – August 2009

(Tips for high-altitude gardeners) by Suzanne Ward Summer Solstice has passed and it is now the warmest time of the year. It’s difficult to remember the cold, dark days of winter – back when we were pining for the warmth of the summer sun. By now you should be enjoying some of the fruits of […]

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Coming to a Backyard Near You…

by Susan Tweit What if you could walk out into your yard and pick a sun-warmed tomato, dripping with juice, for lunch? What if the hardest part of deciding what to cook for dinner was choosing from the box of just-harvested produce delivered to your door?

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From the Compost Bin – July 2009

(Tips for high-altitude gardeners) by Suzanne Ward My sister gardens in the southern United States and complains about the water. “We’ve had too much rain,” she says. Obviously, this is not a problem in our arid Colorado bioregion. Our challenge is to keep enough water on the garden at the right time during the growing […]

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From the Compost Bin – June 2009

(Tips for high-altitude gardeners) by Suzanne Ward At long last it is June, the last frost date and time to plant the garden.? Keep an eye on the weather at this time of year, as it can change quickly.? My farmer father always said, “If you don’t like the weather in Colorado, just wait ten […]

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From the Compost Bin

(Tips for high-altitude gardeners) by Suzanne Ward The quiet of the winter and the warmth of the inside fire, which was such a blessing in January, feels too confining in spring.? We long for the warmth of sunshine after the dark and cold of winter.? It is time to plan the garden.? My Aunt Virginia, […]

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A garden full of weeds

Column by Hal Walter Gardening – July 2005 – Colorado Central Magazine THIS YEAR, for the first time in many, I’ve planted a garden. A good portion of the seeds I’ve planted here at 8,800 feet are actually near descendants of weeds.

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Oil and Compost

Column by George Sibley Gardening – June 2005 – Colorado Central Magazine THE HOT NEW ITEM on the home front is a shredder. Not a shredder like the Enron folk or various government agencies have used to cover their tracks, but one that you shovel leaves, grass, moldy MacDonald wrappers, soggy Shoppers and other rakings […]

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More growing resources

Sidebar by Martha Quillen Gardening – June 2005 – Colorado Central Magazine With Wann and Tweit advising, you should be able to get your garden up and blooming, but both books are in black and white. So you may well want one of those gorgeous, full-color manuals that shows brilliant pictures of garden vegetables, and […]

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