The Rio Grande del Norte National Monument

By Anthony Guerrero In March 2013, President Barack Obama, using executive authority under the Antiquities Act, designated 242,000 acres in Taos, New Mexico, as public lands. This area became a national monument known as the Rio Grande del Norte National Monument. As a result, the land, its rich Hispanic and Native American heritage and the […]

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Air Power – Fighting Wildfires from the Sky

By Ron Sering Prior to the end of World War II, planes were deployed to wildfires as spotters. At the end of the war, with a good supply of surplus bombers, many were quickly deployed as air tankers, dropping water and chemical retardant to support the ground crews. Helicopters are used as well, to make […]

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The Way We Really Were

By Virginia McConnell Simmons Model T’s needed gasoline, frequent repairs and replacement of ruined tires and inner tubes, so in 1911 Salida’s Arkansas Valley Garage Men’s Association undertook promoting tourism. The Rainbow Route soon followed the Arkansas River from near Cañon City to Salida, but a trip to Gunnison required crossing Poncha Pass to Saguache […]

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Hummers

By Tina Mitchell Glittering, feathered jewels of green, orange, dark purple and red charge and chase each other with long, thin, pointed daggers, sputtering like electric sparks. A scene from an animated science-fantasy movie? No, it’s July at Central Colorado’s hummingbird feeders and wildflowers.

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From the Editor: Railroading

By Mike Rosso Confession: I enjoy trains – a lot. I’ve been aboard most of the tourist trains in Colorado, and was lucky enough to hear John McCutcheon sing City of New Orleans in the original Illinois Central club car, chugging down the west side of La Veta Pass one rainy summer afternoon. Sometimes I’ll […]

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Places: San Luis State Park and Wildlife Area

By Ericka Kastner I’ll admit it. I’m usually not much of a state parks gal. I tend to migrate toward wilderness areas, BLM  lands and National Forests. So when my friends asked me to join them on a warm July weekend last summer for a boat outing to the San Luis State Park and Wildlife […]

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Book Review: A Walk in Connection

A Walk in Connection By Tracy Ane Brooks Balboa Press: Paper, 220 pp, $16.99 Reviewed by Annie Dawid One of Mission: Wolf’s directors, Tracy Ane Brooks, has written a memoir of her decades-long journey into connection with animals, specifically wolves and horses. Her book is intended for those readers who believe animals are sentient, intelligent […]

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Book Reviews – Herndon Davis: Painting Colorado History, 1901-1962

By Craig W. Leavett and Thomas J. Noel University Press of Colorado 290 pages, 173 color, 8×10 ISBN 978-1-60732-419-5 (paper), ISBN 978-60732-420-1 (ebook)   Reviewed by Virginia McConnell Simmons Readers who are interested in Colorado’s art and history will welcome this cornucopia of paintings and drawings by Herndon Davis. Although he might not have gained […]

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The Natural World – Butterflies

By Tina Mitchell While birding in Arizona, we had been searching for an hour or so, scanning among the treetops for warblers. Whenever I’d look down to give my neck a break, I’d notice colorful butterflies wafting lazily along. Why were we working so hard to see tiny flitting birds when butterflies – equally colorful, […]

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Still Sweeter Every Day

By Chris Rourke With a sound as sweet as their name, “Free the Honey” blends three-part harmonies and traditional stringed instruments, while telling listeners about the simple goodness of life. Yet this time the Gunnison Valley-based acoustic band has a new song to sing, as it returns to its roots as an all-female trio. Its […]

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Leadville’s Light Rail

By Vince Matthews One hundred and twenty-five years ago, Leadville was Colorado’s second most populous city and was being touted to become the State’s Capital. Indeed, the ridge on the north end of town is called Capitol Hill, and one of the old scenery flies in the Tabor Opera House depicts Colorado’s future Capitol as […]

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The Hilltop Mine – A Relic at 12,900 Feet

Story and photos by Maisie Ramsay High atop the wind-blasted saddle between Mount Sherman and Mount Sheridan sits the time capsule that is the Hilltop Mine. This is not the kind filled with trinkets and buried for future discovery – no, the Hilltop Mine is an accidental time capsule, a relic of times long past, […]

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Great Horned Owls

By Tina Mitchell Who’s awake? Me too! Who’s awake? Me too! In the bleak midwinter, this series of five rhythmic, muffled, slightly eerie hoots – all on one pitch – wafts through the darkness. The sentinel taking attendance is the Great Horned Owl. Measuring nearly 2 feet from head to tail, the Great Horned is […]

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