From the Editor: The Cost of Shelter

By Mike Rosso It’s a pattern repeated throughout Colorado; a small town gets “discovered,” thus becoming a magnet for retirees, lone eagles, trust funders and those simply looking for a quiet place in the mountains. Naturally, these folks need someplace to live, so the demand for housing goes up. But what if the supply does […]

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Sheep’s Gulch Trail

by Ericka Kastner Some might call it “the trail that gets forgotten.” Most wilderness lovers traveling down County Road 390 near Granite are likely headed towards one of the many 14,000-foot peaks in the area. They’ve possibly never heard of Sheep’s Gulch Trail. At least I hadn’t until yesterday, literally. A friend and I were […]

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Salida’s Housing Crunch: A Firsthand Look

By Jessica Wierzbinski It can’t really be that hard to find a place to house your family, right? Not even in a little mountain town that has in recent years become a veritable Mecca for mountain biking, river sporting, alternatively medicating, retiring and any number of other activities folks come here for. Even amid this […]

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The Art and Science of Showing Up

I wrote in my book, Full Tilt Boogie, that for sure no burro gets up in the morning and thinks, “Dang, I think I’ll run up a 13,000-foot mountain pass today.” And likewise, no autistic kid gets up in the morning and thinks, “I think I’ll conform to societal norms today.” I go on to explain […]

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Pursuing Uranium in Fremont County

By Joe Stone The Tallahassee Creek area in western Fremont County offers a degree of serenity conducive to a contemplative lifestyle, evidenced by the presence of a monastic retreat on the banks of Tallahassee Creek. This bucolic setting between Salida and Cañon City seemed ideal, not only to the monks and nuns of the Monastery […]

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A Prospector’s Pick: The Early Town of Cache Creek

By Jan MacKell Collins Hike along Cache Creek outside of Granite today, and you are certain to run into folks all along the water. These aren’t your average outdoor enthusiasts; rather, the folks scrambling along the riverbanks are on a mission. They are looking for gold, which can still be found over 150 years after […]

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The Way We Really Were

By Virginia McConnell Simmons Using native materials, early-day miners constructed arrastras at several remote, streamside locations in Colorado. First introduced to the New World by Spaniards, arrastras pulverized ore while a burro or horse dragged a grinding stone around and around over an existing large rock. Surviving evidence may be a very flat, wide rock […]

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The Man Who Died Twice (part I)

By Daniel Smith For a journalist, some stories, even those which start relatively small, can have long “legs,” and can emotionally touch you. The most intriguing stories, naturally, are those that involve human drama. But throw in a strange twist of fate connecting two seemingly unrelated events and you have … well, stories with a […]

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About the Cover Photograph

By Mike Rosso I had my first photo darkroom when I was 14 years old. It was in the basement of the next door neighbor’s house. I had managed to piece together a rudimentary darkroom consisting of low-end, secondhand equipment and was allowed to use it in exchange for babysitting services. As a teenager, that […]

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Down on the Ground with the Hotshots

By George Sibley I should probably be trying to write something wonky about American politics, but instead I’m writing this article from the near-wilds on the sunny side of Grand Mesa, at a rendezvous of an organization formerly known as the Crested Butte Hotshots. The Hotshots were a forest-fire crew based in Crested Butte who […]

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Quillen’s Corner: Journalism in the Land of the Lost

By Martha Quillen According to those in the know, America has lost it. But what have we lost? Donald Trump says it’s our greatness, because the way he sees it, our nation isn’t feared nor revered anymore, whereas others claim we’ve lost our mojo, which generally refers to our gumption and can-do attitude. Many agree […]

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John Mattingly: Affordable Housing

The absence of affordable housing in a tourist town means a large segment of the seasonal work force must relocate, or make compromises and sacrifices. Long commutes from less expensive areas increase pollution while reducing the net income of workers due to transportation costs and lost time.

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Music Review: Gabrielle Louise – If the Static Clears

Reviewed by Brian Rill Gabrielle Louise should be a movie star. Shrouded in stage lights, her enrapturing silhouette inspires lucid dreams. All that is divine moves on light feet and Gabrielle slowly drips her words onto the ear drum, barely striking it. A pseudo-drawl crawls over enticing acoustic guitar chords, vaguely jazz-laden with western flare. […]

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Book Review – Seasons of the Enemies: The Long Walk of the Navajo

By Sharon Leslie Gearhart Xlibris.com: 2015, 245 pp, $19.95 SC-ISBN: 987-1-4931-1 Reviewed by Virginia McConnell Simmons The subtitle will lead prospective readers to believe this volume to be an account of the exodus of Navajo Indians to Fort Sumner. Instead, it is an amalgam of detailed descriptions of ceremonies that are incorporated into the narrative, […]

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