Vintage Camping Colorado Style

By Mike Rosso We all need a vacation from time to time. But what about a vacation back in time? A time of ducktail hair, poodle skirts, sputnik and Elvis? It’s easy to do if you live within driving distance of the Royal Gorge. Five miles west of Cañon City and just south of U.S. […]

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The Fremont Connection

Residents of Fremont County can now log on to a new community website for news, issues, opinions as well as cultural content and other items of interest. Fremont Connection is the brainchild of Kristina Lins, Bob and Kay Parker, Dan Grenard and Gloria Stultz, who felt the county was not well enough served by the […]

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State Sport?

By Hal Walter There’s movement ahoof to make pack-burro racing Colorado’s official summer sport. Many readers might be surprised to learn I’m not racing my ass to the capitol to support this effort, though I’m not entirely against it either. I just have mixed feelings. Why? Well, let’s start with some basics as many people […]

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Fill ‘er Up! A History of the Gas Pump

By Jackie Powell Filling stations. Service stations. Gas stations. Aren’t they all the same thing? Maybe and maybe not. But they have certainly changed since I was a child in the 1950s. My father would drive into a gas station and the attendant would come out wiping his hands on a greasy red cloth. Full-time […]

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Dreams of Fields

By John Mattingly I look out the window to see my new center pivot on the loose, crossing a road in front of heavy traffic. Cars and trucks are jammed and honking as the machine spreads out like a praying mantis on the warpath, pulling its electric line out of the ground like a giant […]

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Patch Adams: Subversive Healer

By  Jennifer Dempsey Forty-eight years ago, Hunter Doherty Adams vowed never to have another bad day in his life. He was 18 and had been hospitalized for his third suicide attempt. During his stay in the psychiatric ward, Adams had the revelation that there must be a better way to respond to a world that […]

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Quillen’s Corner

By Ed Quillen The exact date cannot be determined now, but it was about twenty years ago, in the late 1980s or early 1990s, that the Salida Improvement Commission began its important work of getting a better class of people in town. “We have entirely too many poor people in town,” one member stated at […]

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A Church without Pews

By Julia Michel On a hill of dry ground, quietly keeping its secrets, stands a white, one-room church with a hand-painted sign in front: Howard’s First Church, 1889. Around the side of the building is a small patch of iris with one in bloom: a splash of lavender on a cold, windy, spring morning. (Iris […]

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Down on the Ground with Sibley’s Economics

By George Sibley I got raked over the coals by a reader in last month’s Colorado Central (August 2011, p. 20), on my June column complaining about “private-sector capitalism.” It was a thoughtful enough critique to warrant some response this month. (Actually, my first thought was – great! It’s not a black hole; someone is […]

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News from the San Luis Valley

by Patty LaTaille Census Shows Significant Migration According to The Denver Post; “Walsenburg and other small traditionally Latino towns in southern Colorado are losing their historic cultural identity. As the older generation dies off and the younger generation moves to cities or resort towns where the jobs are, separations are tearing at close-knit Latino families […]

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Dispatch from the Edge

By Peter Anderson They are both solitary creatures who want to be left alone. The ranger has been swinging a Pulaski all day, clearing deadfall off of highline trails – fifteen miles and twenty lodgepole taken out at 10,000 feet. Back at the wall tent he eats mac and cheese, burrows into his bag, and […]

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The caboose

By Forrest Whitman One of the railroad gems of Colorado Central Country is The Cumbres and Toltec Scenic Railroad. I had a ghost at my side when I spent two days exploring that fantastic railroad this summer. The ghost was that of the greatest railroad writer ever, E.M. Frimbo. It has been rumored that some […]

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Gratitude

By Susan Tweit It rained the other night, wetting the Adirondack chair I had perched on the two flagstones that make up the patio Richard and I have started to lay, stone by stone, in the courtyard just off our bedroom. Fat drops plopped on the red sandstone flags, kicking up puffs of fragrant dust […]

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