Alma: North America’s Highest Incorporated Town

By Laura Van Dusen County: Park Founded: 1873 Elevation: 10,578 ft. Population: 270 (2010) At just over two miles high, Alma is the highest incorporated town in North America. It was a gold mecca in 1859, later silver boomed, and, more recently, prospecting around Alma has focused on spectacular rhodochrosite crystals found at the Sweet […]

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The Natural World: The Greenback Cutthroat

By Tina Mitchell As the Hayden Pass fire exploded in July,  people and their beloved animals had to evacuate. Another group of local residents faced relocation as well. A rare subspecies of cutthroat trout protected by the Endangered Species Act lives in a three-mile stretch of the south prong of Hayden Creek – and even […]

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Down on the Ground with the Hotshots

By George Sibley I should probably be trying to write something wonky about American politics, but instead I’m writing this article from the near-wilds on the sunny side of Grand Mesa, at a rendezvous of an organization formerly known as the Crested Butte Hotshots. The Hotshots were a forest-fire crew based in Crested Butte who […]

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Regional News Roundup

Election Results Salida residents chose Jim LiVecchi as their next mayor, replacing outgoing Mayor Jim Dickson. Chaffee County passed a half-percent sales tax increase to help fund county EMS services. Florence Mayor Keith Ore retained his seat. Leadville elected Greg Labbe as its new mayor. Lake County passed a mill levy to support the hospital […]

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A Visit with Kerry Donovan

by Mike Rosso Colorado native, Highland cattle rancher, educator and ski race volunteer Kerry Donovan wants to be the next Colorado state senator for SD5. Running for the seat soon to be vacated by term-limited Gail Schwartz, the Vail resident claims no personal agenda going into the upcoming race. “The idea of representational government is […]

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From the Editor

 The Postal Blues It’s hard to read a newspaper or watch the news these days without hearing about the supposed dire situation at the U.S. Postal Service (USPS). Although, like much information being disseminated by the powers that be in federal government, there is much to be skeptical about with the numbers and warnings being […]

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Arrival

By Annie Dawid Despite having traveled abroad and lived in diverse places – London, Australia, and a 1951 yellow Jimmy schoolbus in Northern California – these days I don’t want to travel farther than I can see. From my tiny cabin, set in a bowl of the Wet Mountains with a head-on view of the […]

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Dispatch from the Edge

By Peter Anderson The Free box outgrew itself. Now it’s a shed on the edge of town, roof rimmed with windworn Tibetan prayer flags, old mattress leaning up against front wall spray painted with the words “No dumping.” The cardboard box from our garage contains some lightly used fairy wings – still the rage in […]

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Eating may be more effective than voting

By Hal Walter My summer job is winding down, and, wow, has it been interesting, maybe even meaningful. Perhaps even important. I’ve working on a collection of articles, published in a series of three newsletters called “The Farm Beet,” about a group of independent farmers, all of them located on the banks of the Arkansas […]

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Recipe: Asian Duck Roast with Coconut Jasmine Rice

Courtesy of Michelle Gapp Place 5-6 lb. duck, breast up in roasting pan (no rack necessary). Season with honey, soy sauce, Chinese five-spice, coriander, garlic, curry powder, cilantro, basil. Add sweet potatoes, water chestnuts, baby carrots, green onions, mushrooms. Roast at 375 until duck begins to brown. Add 1/4 cup of sweet white wine to […]

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About the Cover Artist: Gloria Jean Countryman

I have to confess that one of my favorite parts of putting out this magazine is coming up with the monthly cover art. As the first impression, I always try to find cover art that is eye-catching and unpredictable. This issue has several articles about ranches and ranching, so I began to mentally visualize what […]

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Driving Nature Into the Ground?

By Bill Hatcher “In Colorado, the outdoors is what’s for dinner!” That’s Sherry Ellms, Professor of Environmental Studies at Naropa University in Boulder. I had asked her what motorized recreation says about American Culture. And while playful, her dining metaphor belies our tendency to “consume” nature. In 1991, 11,700 OHVs (off-highway vehicles, such as dirt […]

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Poncha Springs Fire Station

The Poncha Springs Fire Station, located at the intersection of U.S. Hwy. 50 and U.S. Hwy. 285, is the fourth property featured from the Chaffee County Historic Resources Survey. As stated by Virginia McConnell Simmons in The Upper Arkansas, A Mountain River Valley, Poncha Pass was part of a hub of trails leading in and […]

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George Wade Foott – Art, Artifacts … and Whitewater

Ever since we took over the reins of this magazine last March we’d been hoping to do a profile on George Foott. His wonderfully realistic historic paintings and his legendary boating skills — skills he was still developing well into his late 60s — were an inspiration to many in a variety of intersecting circles […]

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Reintroducing the Tabors: A Series

Part 4 –  The Divorce and Death of Augusta Tabor by Francisco A. Rios Since conjecture leads to supposition, we can suppose that the “old critter” in last month’s letter was Augusta Tabor. At the end of this month’s installment we shall read of her death in California. Meanwhile, it is enlightening to read a […]

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