Los Penitentes del Valle

Understanding the Penitente Church in Southern Colorado and Northern New Mexico by Ruben E. Archuleta Slowly and methodically the candles on the candelabrum are extinguished one by one as the Hermanos (Brothers) recite their prayers and sing the mournful alabados (Penitente hymns) until the last of the thirteen candles is out leaving the morada (meeting […]

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The benefits of doing something stupid

by Ed Quillen One way to meet good people in Central Colorado is to do something stupid. I learned that atop Kenosha Pass on the afternoon of February 5. Martha and I were on our way from Salida to Longmont, where we were supposed to go out to dinner with my brothers and their wives, […]

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Üllr: Diggin’ his New Job

Story and Photos by Mike Rosso As a native of Black Hawk, Colorado, Aaron Peyrouse has been playing in the mountains all his life. He learned to ski at Loveland Ski Area at a young age and eventually became a full-time ski patroller. It was during those years at Loveland that he learned about avalanche […]

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A Few Words about the Cover Girl

by Elliot Jackson The cover photo of my Siberian Husky, Sovay, was taken in early 2009 when, as a vigorous 13-year-old, she was still pacing pal Mike and me up mountain passes and breaking trail when we went snow-shoeing. Sovay, typical of her breed, is a highly energetic dog, easily bored and not all at […]

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The Leadville Ice Palace – A Look Back

by Colorado Central Staff The year was 1895 and the city of Leadville had fallen on hard times. Since 1881, production had declined at its largest and most profitable mines. The repeal of the Sherman Silver Purchase Act in 1893, first enacted to increase the amount of silver the government was required to purchase every […]

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The Clayton Blizzard of 2006

by Michael J. Perullo Just after Christmas 2006, I decided to drive my 1990 Nissan Stanza from Atlanta to Silver Cliff, Colorado to stay in my cabin over New Years’ Eve. What a trip this turned out to be! I love to travel by car or Jeep, and this road trip was to be my […]

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Waiting on Richard’s Marble

By Susan Tweit November 2009 It’s official: my husband, Richard, is missing a marble. Or at least a marble-sized tumor. A week and a half ago, his neurosurgery team removed a purple tumor the size of a large marble from the right temporal lobe of his brain. They reported that they’d gotten the whole thing, […]

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The Story of Soft Salida Brick

by Jackie W. Powell Photos courtesy of The Salida Library People say “Soft Salida brick” as if it were one word. Many believe it was sun-dried, like adobe, and therefore not as hard as fired brick. The myth of sun drying is reinforced by photographs such as Figure 1 , showing thousands of bricks lying […]

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Goodbye to summer, and two horses

by Hal Walter Late summer has its many emotions here in the Wet Mountains, from the blustery days when you first notice the edges of the aspens turning, to the clear blue days that seem never to end as summer becomes fall. But I know in my bones these days will end. At some point […]

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The Mystery of The Malta Cemetery

by Annie Mueller Published by the Colorado Council of Genealogical Societies, the Colorado Cemetery Directory helps the living trace their family histories. Lake County, Colorado has 33 cemetery entries in the Directory. Of these, 13 are listed as abandoned and 18 have “no record available of custodian/owner.” The oldest in that record is the Leadville […]

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Poles of Stone

by Ron Flannery We were motoring up U. S. 50 in the canyon east of Cotopaxi, Colorado. As usual, my dad scanned things beyond the road itself. Suddenly, he said, “Yep, they’re still there.” Not seeing anything but the steep canyon wall on one side and the Arkansas River on the other, I asked, “What’s […]

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From the Compost Bin – October 2009

(Tips for high-altitude gardeners) by Suzanne Ward We have moved into autumn and frost will be visiting our gardens.? It’s not yet time to put it all to rest – there’s still a little more work to be done before winter. ?When frost threatens, it is wise to be prepared.? The first frost is often […]

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Goat-Oriented

by John Mattingly I don’t admit this in the mixed company of cattle ranchers, but I used to have goats. Yes, the fact is, I had many goats, such that it was the profits from various goat operations in the late ‘60s and early ‘70s that enabled me to get into the cattle business and […]

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Peace of Art Café

Regional restaurant review by Patty LaTaille Organic Peddler 14475 W. Hwy. 160 Del Norte, CO 81132 (719) 65-Peace Healthy eaters and vegetarian travelers can now travel through the San Luis Valley with peace of mind and a culinary destination ahead. There exists an oasis of organic food and drinks in the meat and fried potatoes […]

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Scholarly Peaks of Colorado

How did the Collegiate Peaks, the towering mountains that soar above the Upper Arkansas River Valley, get their Ivy League names? The tradition began in 1869 when members of the first Harvard Mining School class named 14,420-foot Mount Harvard after their institution while on expedition with Josiah Dwight Whitney, professor of geology at Harvard. The […]

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