News from the San Luis Valley

by Marcia Darnell Back to Work The lockout at Harborlite Corp. is over, and 29 union workers are back on the job. The lockout began Oct. 8 when negotiations between the plant owners and the Teamsters broke down. Both sides say issues remain, but resolution is closer. Harborlite operates a perlite mine 20 miles southeast […]

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State House Update

by Christopher Kolomitz The 67th General Assembly Colorado state senators and representatives convened for the 67th general assembly Jan. 13 in Denver. The session ends on May 12 and is likely to be dominated by efforts to find a balanced budget. Other hot topics include the medical marijuana debate, natural resources, and jobs. Democrats control […]

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Sea Slugs Go Green

by Susan Tweit One of the wonders of nature, as I see it, is all we don’t know about the world around us, the everyday relationships and behaviors of species large and small that fly, swim, run, crawl, slither, and root in earth and sea. Take, for example, a recently published study that elicited this […]

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Reintroducing the Tabors: A Series

by Francisco A. Rios LETTERS FROM CHIHUAHUA (Editor’s note: Dr. Rios, a retired professor from the University of Colorado at Denver, spent 805 volunteer hours over a span of one year and seven months cataloging hundreds of letters from the Tabor Collection at the Colorado Historical Society (CHS) onto a computer database. We are reproducing […]

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THE CHAFFEE COUNTY COURTHOUSE An Art Deco Gem

photos and story by Mike Rosso A prominent Pueblo-based architect with multiple buildings listed on the National Historic Register is responsible for the “Art Deco” style typified in the original Chaffee County Courthouse in Salida. Walter DeMordaunt, who practiced architecture in Pueblo, Colorado from 1920 to 1962, was hired to design the courthouse in 1929 […]

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Centralized vs. Distributed Solar Energy

by  Aaron Mandelkorn The solar electricity industry is currently embracing two distinctive approaches best described as centralized and distributed energy models. In recent years the shift from distributed, utility-owned solar electric systems to large private utility scale, and utility/ owner systems has become more prevalent. Each approach has its pros and cons and the truth […]

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A Farmer Far Afield – A House is A House, Part 2

by John Mattingly Editor’s Note: Part 1 of this series ran in the May 2008 Colorado Central Magazine. Last month, Hal Walter described a rural-residential real estate situation in the greater Wet Mountain Valley that is mirrored to the west in the greater Moffat-Crestone region. The class of homes for sale ranges from a single-wide […]

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Book Review – The Trail of Gold and Silver: Mining in Colorado

The Trail of Gold and Silver: Mining in Colorado, 1859-2009 By Duane A. Smith Published in 2009 by University Press of Colorado ISBN 978-0-87081-975-5 $26.95; vii+282 pages Reviewed by Virginia McConnell Simmons After chronicling nearly every facet of gold and silver mining in Colorado, from the Caribou camp to Horace Tabor and Baby Doe, Duane […]

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The Geo-seasonal Vagaries of Custer County Business

by Hal Walter It’s perhaps an irony that the Feed Barn and The Feed Store both recently closed their doors here in Custer County. The Feed Barn was a 25-year-old livestock and pet feed business founded by a longtime ranching family. It has changed hands twice since it opened, and I am one of a […]

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About the Cover Artist: Gloria Jean Countryman

I have to confess that one of my favorite parts of putting out this magazine is coming up with the monthly cover art. As the first impression, I always try to find cover art that is eye-catching and unpredictable. This issue has several articles about ranches and ranching, so I began to mentally visualize what […]

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Driving Nature Into the Ground?

By Bill Hatcher “In Colorado, the outdoors is what’s for dinner!” That’s Sherry Ellms, Professor of Environmental Studies at Naropa University in Boulder. I had asked her what motorized recreation says about American Culture. And while playful, her dining metaphor belies our tendency to “consume” nature. In 1991, 11,700 OHVs (off-highway vehicles, such as dirt […]

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Poncha Springs Fire Station

The Poncha Springs Fire Station, located at the intersection of U.S. Hwy. 50 and U.S. Hwy. 285, is the fourth property featured from the Chaffee County Historic Resources Survey. As stated by Virginia McConnell Simmons in The Upper Arkansas, A Mountain River Valley, Poncha Pass was part of a hub of trails leading in and […]

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George Wade Foott – Art, Artifacts … and Whitewater

Ever since we took over the reins of this magazine last March we’d been hoping to do a profile on George Foott. His wonderfully realistic historic paintings and his legendary boating skills — skills he was still developing well into his late 60s — were an inspiration to many in a variety of intersecting circles […]

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Reintroducing the Tabors: A Series

Part 4 –  The Divorce and Death of Augusta Tabor by Francisco A. Rios Since conjecture leads to supposition, we can suppose that the “old critter” in last month’s letter was Augusta Tabor. At the end of this month’s installment we shall read of her death in California. Meanwhile, it is enlightening to read a […]

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Quillen’s Corner

Whose History is It? Theirs or Ours? By Martha Quillen In the 1990s, an increasing number of New West historians tried to alter common ideas about Old West history. Their attempts to change people’s minds were met with vociferous derision, passionate support and hot debate. And thus, American history experienced a renaissance, which thereby boosted […]

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