Book Review – Heading Home Field Notes

By Peter Anderson Conundrum Press, 2017 978-1-9422-8021-7; 84 pp.; $14.99 Reviewed by Lynda La Rocca Short, but sweet – and wistful, sad, thoughtful, funny, poignant, or filled with longing. That’s how I’d describe the essays that make up Crestone-based writer, teacher and poet Peter Anderson’s latest book, Heading Home: Field Notes. These lyrical musings, which […]

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The Natural World

By Tina Mitchell As we hiked above treeline, the path took a right turn and our ears filled with high-pitched, squeezed-dog-toy squeaks. The dogs snapped to attention, so we made sure we had them on short leashes. We had entered the realm of American Pikas. Small mammals related to rabbits and other lagomorphs (even though […]

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Eye on the Fifth

By Daniel Smith Pretty soon you may need that proverbial program to keep the candidates straight in Colorado’s Fifth Congressional District. When Colorado Central editor asked me to write this column, I wondered if there would be enough activity in the district race to keep thing interesting – obviously, he was prescient.

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Colorado Then & Now: Chapter VI. Leadville & Vicinity

Note: The following is an excerpt from the book, Colorado Then & Now by Grant Collier and his grandfather Joseph Collier. “This mountain was named after the miners, after D. C. Collier, one of the editors and proprietors of the Register, in consideration of his eminent success as a prospector. The view is from the […]

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Railroading Returns to Como

Article and photos by Laura Van Dusen It’s been 80 years since the last train left the Como depot. Eighty years, a lifetime ago, since a train whistle gave a last shout pulling away from the station, and a narrow-gauge engine, steam belching from its stack, pulled rail cars across South Park.

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The Original Colorado Central

The Colorado Central Railroad had a rocky history. Some of the conflicts around its birth are still echoed in fights over the route of Interstate 70 up the mountains from Golden. The railroad even began with a fight. That was in the 1870s amid a contest between two railroad magnates, Willam A. H. Loveland of […]

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From the Editor: About This Issue

By Mike Rosso I’d like to start off with a bit of business. Last month, due to negligence on the part of our new printer, many of you received only a portion of the July issue and in some cases, only the cover. The problem lay with the “stitch and trim” process, the last order […]

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About the Cover Photographer: Grant Collier

Grant Collier grew up in the foothills above Denver and spent much of his childhood exploring Colorado’s Rocky Mountains. Grant took up photography while attending college in Los Angeles. He found endless photographic opportunities in the Desert Southwest while driving to and from L.A. After graduating from college in 1996, Grant began a photographic career […]

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Touring (and Arguing) The Great Railroad War

By Forrest Whitman Lots of the railroad history around Central Colorado is fun to discuss and argue about. The great railroad war (1878-1890) was a fierce fight. The contenders were General William Jackson Palmer’s Denver and Rio Grande Railroad versus the Santa Fe Railroad led by William Barstow Strong and Thomas Nickerson. The reader is […]

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places … The Midland Tunnels

By Ericka Kastner During Leadville’s bustling mining days of the late 1800s, the town of Buena Vista was served by three separate railroads and the standard-gauge Colorado Midland arrived last – in 1887. A steep, uphill buggy ride from Buena Vista gave passengers access to the Midland Depot, which was situated high above town and […]

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The ‘Stack Turns 100

By Susan Jesuroga Beyond the old brick storefronts in downtown Salida and the ghost of the rail yard, long dismantled, there is still one tall and unmistakable symbol of Salida’s industrial past. This sight is familiar to any traveler entering Salida from the north: the 365-foot smelter smokestack. In the late 1800s, Western states saw […]

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The Salida Studio Tour 2017

The biennial Salida Studio Tour will be showcasing 22 Salida fine artists and crafters in 19 studios inside city limits and the immediate surrounding area of Salida on Saturday, August 12, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday, August 13, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. This year’s artists are known locally and nationally […]

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What if Wildflowers Could Sing?

By Hal Walter Peter May has been a musician for most of his life, and even co-produced and played on a Grammy Award-winning album, but he never dreamed he’d be the composer for one of the greatest symphonies in the universe – nature. The 52-year-old Michigan native and longtime Crestone resident recently released his new […]

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Whither Pack-Burro Racing?

The sages tell us that everything is always changing, and in fact the Greek philosopher Heraclitus said that nothing endures but change itself. Thus is the case of Colorado’s indigenous sport of pack-burro racing. It began back in 1949 with a race over Mosquito Pass to Fairplay. Nearly seven decades later I’m beginning to wonder […]

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The Saguache County Museum

By Connie Rapalski The Saguache County Museum began as an idea that grew into a huge community project. At the time, all Colorado communities were asked to join in the 1976 Centennial celebration of the Rush to the Rockies, which brought miners and other pioneers to Colorado. Several clubs including the Saguache Women’s Club along […]

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