The Crowded Acre: Soccer Mom

By Jennifer Welch I’m not entirely sure how the thing happened. I was there, of course, when it happened. I even took part in the happening of the thing. But I still can’t be sure of the how part. And, you know, life goes on – blah, blah, blah, we will all survive – yada, […]

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Eye on the 5th

By Daniel Smith Our second column focusing on the 5th Congressional District finds an interesting, if somewhat predictable, turn of events. The 10-year incumbent, Doug Lamborn, now has a Republican primary challenger: 32-year-old Owen Hill, a two-term state senator who recently announced he would challenge the 62-year-old representative, telling the Colorado Springs Gazette that frustration […]

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The Lost Canyon Placer

Article and photos by Kenneth Jessen Located west of Granite, Colorado, is the Lost Canyon Placer, with its two remaining cabins on the north side of County Road 398 and a creek on the south side. To get to Lost Canyon requires heading west past the Granite Cemetery and the site of Cache Creek. The […]

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From the Editor: The Great War

By Mike Rosso I just finished watching PBS’s three-part series, The Great War, about the first large-scale, post industrial global war. It was quite an eye-opener. I’ve been fascinated by that devastating conflict since reading All Quiet on the Western Front by German World War I veteran, Erich Maria Remarque.

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About the Artist: Denise Micciche

I have been doing art since childhood, and while not currently a working artist, I make every effort to keep it in my life. I studied art formally at San Francisco State University and in 1992 received a Bachelor’s of Art in Painting and Printmaking. Both mediums are a passion, but since living in Colorado […]

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Autoawareness

By Hal Walter As I write it’s autism awareness month and I find myself reflecting upon just how aware we really are as a society. To kick things off, the White House was lit up blue. Yet the new education secretary and supreme court justice are not exactly known as champions of those with special […]

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The Rise of HRWW and Gophers

By John Mattingly Temperatures in the Valley have been warm this season, and modeling shows spring arriving two to three weeks early this year. The notion that the weather and climate have a timetable may be a prime example of hubris, but there clearly are signals in global weather that are changing, and whether they […]

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Prisoners of War in Colorado

By Mike Rosso During World War II – from 1943 to 1946 – Colorado was home to around 43 Prisoner of War (POW) Camps, according to Metropolitan State University of Denver. Nationwide, there were 175 Branch Camps serving 511 Area Camps housing nearly 425,000 POWs, most of whom were German, although some of the earliest […]

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The Salida Circus turns Ten

By Elliot Jackson “When I came to Salida and began talking about starting a circus,” says Jennifer Dempsey, artistic director of the Salida Circus, “people thought I was nuts. So I stopped talking about it and just started doing it.” If anyone still thinks that, they aren’t saying so as Salida Circus stands on the […]

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Fish’s Heads

In Memory of Ted Fish On March 10 of this year, Salida artist Ted Fish died due to complications from heart surgery at St. Joseph Hospital in Denver. Ted was born in New York City in 1946 and grew up in East Stroudsburg, Pa. In 1971 he received his BA in political science at East […]

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The Way We Really Were

By Virginia McConnell Simmons During the elections in 1892 and in 2016, the respective populism bore no resemblance one to the other. In Colorado in 1892, union organization – especially the Western Federation of Miners (WFM) – was growing rapidly, while mine owners were trying to increase the three-dollar-a-day, eight-hour work day to nine without […]

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From the Editor: Springtime in the Rockies

By Mike Rosso Outside my window the sun is shining. The lawn is revealing signs of green and the lilac bushes are cautiously budding. This past winter came and went, not like a lion, but a lamb. Sure, there were a few snowy days here in Salida, but they were the exception. The snow shovel […]

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The Synchronicity of Spring Break

By Hal Walter Spring break is always an odd time around here and always seems to catch me by surprise. While Harrison gets a week off from school, and Mary has a real job with paid vacation, my professional life – such as it is – makes it virtually impossible to take off 10 straight […]

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