Autoawareness

By Hal Walter As I write it’s autism awareness month and I find myself reflecting upon just how aware we really are as a society. To kick things off, the White House was lit up blue. Yet the new education secretary and supreme court justice are not exactly known as champions of those with special […]

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The Rise of HRWW and Gophers

By John Mattingly Temperatures in the Valley have been warm this season, and modeling shows spring arriving two to three weeks early this year. The notion that the weather and climate have a timetable may be a prime example of hubris, but there clearly are signals in global weather that are changing, and whether they […]

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Prisoners of War in Colorado

By Mike Rosso During World War II – from 1943 to 1946 – Colorado was home to around 43 Prisoner of War (POW) Camps, according to Metropolitan State University of Denver. Nationwide, there were 175 Branch Camps serving 511 Area Camps housing nearly 425,000 POWs, most of whom were German, although some of the earliest […]

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The Salida Circus turns Ten

By Elliot Jackson “When I came to Salida and began talking about starting a circus,” says Jennifer Dempsey, artistic director of the Salida Circus, “people thought I was nuts. So I stopped talking about it and just started doing it.” If anyone still thinks that, they aren’t saying so as Salida Circus stands on the […]

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Fish’s Heads

In Memory of Ted Fish On March 10 of this year, Salida artist Ted Fish died due to complications from heart surgery at St. Joseph Hospital in Denver. Ted was born in New York City in 1946 and grew up in East Stroudsburg, Pa. In 1971 he received his BA in political science at East […]

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The Way We Really Were

By Virginia McConnell Simmons During the elections in 1892 and in 2016, the respective populism bore no resemblance one to the other. In Colorado in 1892, union organization – especially the Western Federation of Miners (WFM) – was growing rapidly, while mine owners were trying to increase the three-dollar-a-day, eight-hour work day to nine without […]

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From the Editor: Springtime in the Rockies

By Mike Rosso Outside my window the sun is shining. The lawn is revealing signs of green and the lilac bushes are cautiously budding. This past winter came and went, not like a lion, but a lamb. Sure, there were a few snowy days here in Salida, but they were the exception. The snow shovel […]

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The Synchronicity of Spring Break

By Hal Walter Spring break is always an odd time around here and always seems to catch me by surprise. While Harrison gets a week off from school, and Mary has a real job with paid vacation, my professional life – such as it is – makes it virtually impossible to take off 10 straight […]

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Quillen’s Corner: The Truth Shall Set You Free

By Martha Quillen I’m in the midst of an enormous overhaul, emptying closets, file cabinets, book cases and drawers, combing through years of detritus, and getting ready to revamp my life. Where am I going? What am I going to do? I don’t have time to contemplate that. I have forty years of mementos to […]

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John Mattingly: To Tell The Truth

The TV game show, To Tell The Truth, has three contestants who have a special skill or unusual occupation, and a panel asks questions to guess who is telling the truth. We now have a similar show going on in national politics, only we already know who is not telling the truth.

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Mountain Biking on Salida’s Trails

By Ericka Kastner Sometimes in life the places we travel to are geographic, an actual destination we can pinpoint on the globe. At other times though, the places we go exist only in our minds; they are mental attachments, places we wander to in times of great joy, or senseless fear. My relationship with mountain […]

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Book Reviews – A Short History of Denver

Stephen J. Leonard, Thomas J. Noel University of Nevada Press, paper, 212 pp, $21.95 Reviewed by Annie Dawid History and “short” don’t usually go well together, but in this case, the celebrated Denver Post columnist Thomas J. Noel and his co-writer, Stephen J. Leonard, history professor at the University of Colorado-Denver, make the combination fascinating, […]

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Blinded by the Light

By Doris Dembosky, Westcliffe, CO Slowing to a stop at an intersection, I wait for a green light. A homeless woman, old before her time, stands at arm’s length; she stands too close. She could reach out and touch my car if she chose to do so. She looks at me. She dares me to […]

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The Caboose: Spring Optimism for us Rail Passengers

By Forrest Whitman There was a lot of hopeful passenger train talk on my recent trip from Denver to Seattle on AMTRAK. On the first leg of that trip, the California Zephyr carried over 800 passengers. The train up the coast from Sacramento to Seattle looked full too. No one in either train’s lounge car […]

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