Quillen’s Corner: Run for Your Lives, Nice Guys

By Martha Quillen Do nice guys finish first? Or last? That’s a classic question, but what I want to know is not where nice guys finish (since they likely finish in different places), but what merits the designation “nice.” In our era, citizens tend to either praise political VIPs or call them stupid – and […]

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George Sibley: Down on the Ground with the Great Divide

By George Sibley You’re probably thinking I mean the “Continental Divide.” No, I’m talking – again – about the lurking ghost that has always haunted America, but which burst forth in full dark bloom in last year’s election: the urban-rural divide. Or, as demographers increasingly characterize it today: the metropolitan-nonmetropolitan divide.

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Places: Cottonwood Creek

By Ericka Kastner I’m pretty sure I’m going to regret telling you about this trail. It’s long been one of my favorites – this is the spot where I go when I need a day knee-deep in wilderness. This is the trail that I keep quiet about, only inviting certain people along to experience the […]

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The Real Deal Music Review: Pint & A Half – Boomtown Ghosts

By Brian Rill Pint & A Half return from their part-time gig as Smeltertown ghost whisperers to record the stories of forgotten souls who paved the way through old mining town memories, while raising a rags-to-riches fairy tale in this western small town paradise of Salida, Colorado. Regrouping, the pair this time collaborates with legendary […]

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Reviews: The Silver Baron’s Wife

By Donna Baier Stein Serving House Books ISBN 978-0-997010-6-5 Reviewed by Forrest Whitman Lizzy “Baby Doe” Tabor is a tough subject for any novelist to pick, and Donna Stein has done a good job here. There are hundreds of books and articles written about this famous figure from Colorado history. There are also plays and […]

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Museums of Central Colorado: The Past Returns to Crestone

By James P. McCalpin Beginning this month, we will be profiling many of the museums that can be found throughout the region. Often staffed by community volunteers, these institutions play a vital role in archiving and documenting the history of the region and help to keep us connected to the past. We begin the series […]

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The Crowded Acre: Soccer Mom

By Jennifer Welch I’m not entirely sure how the thing happened. I was there, of course, when it happened. I even took part in the happening of the thing. But I still can’t be sure of the how part. And, you know, life goes on – blah, blah, blah, we will all survive – yada, […]

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Eye on the 5th

By Daniel Smith Our second column focusing on the 5th Congressional District finds an interesting, if somewhat predictable, turn of events. The 10-year incumbent, Doug Lamborn, now has a Republican primary challenger: 32-year-old Owen Hill, a two-term state senator who recently announced he would challenge the 62-year-old representative, telling the Colorado Springs Gazette that frustration […]

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The Lost Canyon Placer

Article and photos by Kenneth Jessen Located west of Granite, Colorado, is the Lost Canyon Placer, with its two remaining cabins on the north side of County Road 398 and a creek on the south side. To get to Lost Canyon requires heading west past the Granite Cemetery and the site of Cache Creek. The […]

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From the Editor: The Great War

By Mike Rosso I just finished watching PBS’s three-part series, The Great War, about the first large-scale, post industrial global war. It was quite an eye-opener. I’ve been fascinated by that devastating conflict since reading All Quiet on the Western Front by German World War I veteran, Erich Maria Remarque.

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About the Artist: Denise Micciche

I have been doing art since childhood, and while not currently a working artist, I make every effort to keep it in my life. I studied art formally at San Francisco State University and in 1992 received a Bachelor’s of Art in Painting and Printmaking. Both mediums are a passion, but since living in Colorado […]

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Autoawareness

By Hal Walter As I write it’s autism awareness month and I find myself reflecting upon just how aware we really are as a society. To kick things off, the White House was lit up blue. Yet the new education secretary and supreme court justice are not exactly known as champions of those with special […]

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The Rise of HRWW and Gophers

By John Mattingly Temperatures in the Valley have been warm this season, and modeling shows spring arriving two to three weeks early this year. The notion that the weather and climate have a timetable may be a prime example of hubris, but there clearly are signals in global weather that are changing, and whether they […]

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Prisoners of War in Colorado

By Mike Rosso During World War II – from 1943 to 1946 – Colorado was home to around 43 Prisoner of War (POW) Camps, according to Metropolitan State University of Denver. Nationwide, there were 175 Branch Camps serving 511 Area Camps housing nearly 425,000 POWs, most of whom were German, although some of the earliest […]

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