Greenback Cutthroat Trout Update

By Tina Mitchell In July, 2016, a lightning strike sparked the Hayden Pass Fire in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Within days, it had exploded into a 26-square-mile conflagration that forced area residents to evacuate. As they prepared to head out, firefighters raced in. Following close behind, a team of more than 30 specially trained […]

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The Rusty Lung: Salida’s Newest Trail

By Mike Rosso Since 2006, a group of volunteers named Salida Mountain Trails (SMT) have been steadily increasing the number and quality of non-motorized, multi-use trails in the Salida vicinity. The latest addition to the extensive trail system harkens back to the early days of mountain biking in the area. Back in the 1980s, mountain […]

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Gardening in Circles: Give Peas a Chance

By John Mattingly Shutting down a garden is like saying goodbye to a good old friend who visited for the summer, a friend who challenged you, fed you, worked you, taught you the upside of patience and sharpened your powers of observation and contemplation. You knew the friend had to leave, but in the course […]

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Quillen’s Corner

What Do Affordable Housing, Equality, and World Peace Have In Common? By Martha Quillen A story in the July 6 Mountain Mail made me laugh – until I realized it wasn’t a joke. The article was about how Jackson, Wyoming, planned to address “its worker housing shortage” by establishing a parking lot where workers could sleep […]

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George Sibley: Down On The Ground with Meaningful Work

The president’s promise to bring “good jobs” back to America, we are told, was a major factor in his election. These “good jobs” he and his supporters want to bring back were mainly manufacturing jobs, in heavy industries such as making steel and other metals, logging and sawing lumber, mining coal and minerals, drilling for […]

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Dispatch From The Edge

By Peter Anderson I tell her I need to replace the glass top of an electric range. I tell her how the bear broke into our house, stood on top of the stove hoping to find some goodies in a nearby cabinet, and fell through the glass instead. “I understand,” says the woman on the […]

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Monarch Crest Crank

By Maggie Frasure This year marks the 19th Annual Monarch Crest Crank. Taking place on Sunday, September 17, this annual fundraising bike ride wraps up Salida Bike Fest and benefits the Alliance Against Domestic Abuse (AADA).

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The Crowded Acre: Maybe

By Jennifer Welch Maybe being a farmer is akin to being a glutton for punishment. As farmers, we take on nearly insurmountable tasks against the worst odds and try to make a living out of it. We watch animals die and crops fail and weather reign supreme over our best fought intentions. Collectively, we’ve seen […]

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Book Review: Trouble Returns

by Nancy Oswald ISBN 978-0-86541 Filter Press LLC $8.95; 209pp Reviewed by Forrest Whitman I wish I’d had an author like Nancy Oswald to read when I was ten. This is the third in the series of adventures about young Ruby and her donkey Maude in Cripple Creek. Oswald is careful to present the mystery […]

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Denied

By Patty LaTaille 1990. Heidelberg, Germany. Schiller International University. College student – me – accepted from State University of New York, Cortland. Germany in a historic tumultuous transitional time. Took a sledgehammer to Berlin Wall – fell two months previous. Willkommen in Deutschland. Treated with kindness, curiosity, consideration and respect. My knowledge and practice of the […]

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The Eurasian Thistlehead Weevil

By Maisie Ramsay Consider the goldfinch. Spinus tristis flits about the countryside, its vibrant plumage imbued with arnica-blossom yellow. This wind-borne drop of gold can be found here in Chaffee County, fluttering from rural fence posts with the whimsy of a mountain breeze. The finch makes lavish use of thistle, a plant whose prickly reputation […]

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Postcards from Summer Vacation

By Hal Walter It was perhaps fitting that the first real day of school coincided with the solar eclipse. For like the eclipse, it’s difficult to imagine such an event will happen until it actually does, and you don’t want to stare at the date on the calendar too hard lest it burn a hole […]

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The BVStrong Dinner

Building Community Since 2014 By Mike Rosso Photos by Lee Robinson There had been heavy rainfall in the days leading up to a visit to Agnes Vaille Falls by the Johnson family of Buena Vista on September 30, 2013. Agnes Vaille, on the southern slope of Mt. Princeton near Nathrop had been a popular spot […]

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