A Snapshot of Gratitude

By Hal Walter I don’t get a lot of photo assignments, but I wish I got more like the one this past Thanksgiving week. Publisher Mike Rosso emailed, overwhelmed with a production deadline and a move. He asked if I happened to know the Rusk family and if I could perhaps take pictures of them to […]

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The National Mining Hall of Fame and Museum

By Stephen L. Whittington The National Mining Hall of Fame and Museum (NMHFM) was founded in Leadville in 1987 and occupies the former high school building, built in 1899. In 1988, the U.S. Congress granted the NMHFM a Federal charter, which was signed by President Ronald Reagan. The NMHFM is an independent non-profit organization and […]

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Dispatch From the Edge

By Peter Anderson As you head into the good cheer of the holidays, you run into an old friend on the corner downtown between the bank and the post office who happens to be hauling a hydraulic wood splitter. And you have several piñons, decimated by an influx of beetles, which have been downed and […]

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Places: Our Lady of Guadalupe Church

By Daniel Smith Nestled in the historically important San Luis Valley, the town of Conejos is the home of one of the early settlements in Colorado, dating back to the 1850s, and a religious treasure with a history appropriate to look back on at this Christmas season. Folk legend tells of a stubborn burro which […]

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Perfect Imperfection

By Jennifer Welch My heifer has a penis. If you remember, it wasn’t too long ago that I was waiting for my dairy cow to calve. And I called heifer. So you can imagine my surprise when my heifer was born … with a penis. Damn. I guess it’s true that we can’t always get […]

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Water Update

By John Orr MINUTE 323 Several tributaries of the Colorado River get their start in the crags of the Central Colorado mountains. Storied rivers: Blue, Eagle, Roaring Fork and the powerhouse Gunnison. They’ve all faced the footstep of humankind. The mines dotting the slopes, hay fields, ranching, orchards and cornfields bear witness and are now […]

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Victor: The End of the Road

By Mike Rosso Victor, Colorado, is not on the way to anywhere else. To get there requires dedicated purpose. Those arriving for the first time will discover a time capsule of a town, a place that seems left behind from the modern world, yet still occupied by a hearty citizenry, who seem to prefer living […]

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The Perfect Season

By Hal Walter It was one of those awkward encounters. A casual acquaintance threw out a random statement and it made me think. In this case it was in a grocery store and the statement was essentially that there’s such a gap in this country, everything from homeless people “doing nothing” begging in the streets […]

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Center: In the Middle of the San Luis Valley

By Anthony Guerrero There is a small town in the center of the San Luis Valley and its location has gifted it with the name Center, Colorado. It is also not uncommon to hear the Spanish pronunciation, Centro since it is populated by a very large Hispanic and immigrant population. Center was incorporated on January […]

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Greenback Cutthroat Trout Update

By Tina Mitchell In July, 2016, a lightning strike sparked the Hayden Pass Fire in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Within days, it had exploded into a 26-square-mile conflagration that forced area residents to evacuate. As they prepared to head out, firefighters raced in. Following close behind, a team of more than 30 specially trained […]

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The Rusty Lung: Salida’s Newest Trail

By Mike Rosso Since 2006, a group of volunteers named Salida Mountain Trails (SMT) have been steadily increasing the number and quality of non-motorized, multi-use trails in the Salida vicinity. The latest addition to the extensive trail system harkens back to the early days of mountain biking in the area. Back in the 1980s, mountain […]

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Gardening in Circles: Give Peas a Chance

By John Mattingly Shutting down a garden is like saying goodbye to a good old friend who visited for the summer, a friend who challenged you, fed you, worked you, taught you the upside of patience and sharpened your powers of observation and contemplation. You knew the friend had to leave, but in the course […]

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The Last Word: Commissioner Hal?

By Hal Walter The early morning phone call caught me by surprise. It was a longtime and well-respected friend and neighbor. As I was rushing about trying to get my son Harrison to the school bus, he quickly explained he was calling on behalf of some local citizens hoping to draft me to run for […]

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Quillen’s Corner: Being Top Dog Is Overrated

By Martha Quillen Everything I ever really needed to know I could have learned from my dog. But for some reason I didn’t realize how smart he was until after he was gone. Bodie died last month (with a jolt of assistance from the vet). He’d started getting sick about three months earlier, and the […]

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