George Sibley: Down on the Ground with Democracy Again

By George Sibley Trying to reduce the personal library a while back, I came across a book titled The Irony of Democracy: An Uncommon Introduction to American Politics. I have no idea where I got it – probably some yard sale – and don’t remember ever opening it. By the reduction standards I’ve set, it […]

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John Mattingly: The Sap in Sapiens

By John Mattingly In the fall of the year, when the season’s efforts – good and bad – must be accepted, and preparations for the next year are less demanding, it is nice to sit on a tractor all day and watch Earth turn from daybreak to dusk. The light has a slant and richness […]

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Places: Desert Reef Hot Spring

Story and photos by Ericka Kastner Something tells me you haven’t heard of this one. Both Colorado visitors and residents alike know that one of the best things about this great state is its hot springs. It might be lesser known that a private, clothing optional, family-friendly soaking pool with unobstructed mountain views, Desert Reef […]

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Book Review: The Man Who Thought He Owned the Water

By Tershia D’Elgin University Press of Colorado, 2016 978-1-607-495-9; 287 pp, $29.95 Reviewed by Virginia McConnell Simmons Although Central Colorado is the birthplace of three of Colorado’s major waterways – the South Platte, Arkansas, and Rio Grande – who owns the water seems puzzling except among water managers and farmers. Most consumers simply take it […]

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Ghost Breweries of Colorado

By Robert McLeod The following are two excerpts from a new book, Ghost Breweries of Colorado, A History of Centennial State Brewing, by author Robert W. McLeod of Arvada. He is also the author of A Colorado Chronology, a collection of several thousand nuggets of Colorado history and A Valley So Grand, a history of […]

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The Man Who Died Twice (Part 2)

By Daniel Smith Seared into his memory, Bill Reeves remembers the moment: “Soon the downdraft pushed us below the clouds, just enough to where I could see pine trees off our left wing tip fairly closely, and looked ahead and there was a ridge coming at us. I said ‘ridge’ and ‘turn’ and Wil turned […]

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The Way We Really Were

By Virginia McConnell Simmons Identifying “Our President” will be a mystery if you believe the inked script. In fact, only after President McKinley’s assassination, with no living vice president to fill the office, was T.R. catapulted into the presidency in September 1903. Some sharp-eyed Central Coloradans will note that the locomotive should have borne the […]

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From the Editor: The First Amendment

By Mike Rosso Is the freedom of the press in the United States under attack? Judging from the past year, the evidence would suggest so. First, you’ve got the Republican nominee for president insisting libel laws be changed to make it easier to sue the media. His reasons for this are obvious; the media’s reporting […]

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About the Cover Artist: Padgett McFeely

After earning a BA in Psychology at UC Irvine, I began studying photography. Immediately enthralled by the ‘wet’ darkroom process, I started working extensively with the black and white medium. My first teacher was Barbara Kasten. The first lecture I ever attended was given by Ansel Adams. I was hooked! Photography quickly became my way […]

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Hal Walter: A Gorilla Named Train

My friend Don Conoscenti, a Taos musician who also lived in Alamosa for a while, put out a new album recently called Anastasia. The collection includes new songs as well as remakes of some of his previous work. My son Harrison is a fan of Don’s as well, dwelling particularly on a track called “That […]

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The Natural World: The Greenback Cutthroat

By Tina Mitchell As the Hayden Pass fire exploded in July,  people and their beloved animals had to evacuate. Another group of local residents faced relocation as well. A rare subspecies of cutthroat trout protected by the Endangered Species Act lives in a three-mile stretch of the south prong of Hayden Creek – and even […]

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A New Breed: Women Ranchers

By Judy Buffington Sammons In the old West, around the turn of the century, a few ranchers’ daughters – a brazen few – decided to shake up the establishment a little bit, rock the boat and rattle a few cages. They put on shocking divided skirts or even pants borrowed from fathers or brothers. They […]

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