Down on the Ground with Our Land

By George Sibley “Creative destruction” is a term we’re most familiar with in the context of capitalist economics: the restless flow and ebb of capital in its often mindless, generally heartless, search for The Next Big Thing – steam abandoned for internal combustion, coal yielding to natural gas yielding to solar, typewriters losing to computers, […]

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Quillen’s Corner – It’s a Mad, Mad World, at Home and Abroad

By Martha Quillen It’s hard to know whether the most serious problem facing our world today is rising temperatures or rising tempers, but perhaps they’re related. Maybe tempers are rising because modern life confronts people with so much that seems out of their control, such as climate change, war, terrorism, escalating costs and changing technology.

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Places: Turkey Rock

Story and photo by Ericka Kastner When I venture into the wilderness, I frequently experience a shift in my perspective on life, a fresh way of seeing things. My recent visit to Turkey Rock on the first day of spring offered the perfect metaphor for this experience.

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Dogs – John Mattingly

By John Mattingly I don’t dislike dogs. But this doesn’t mean I would run a mile to divert a dog from jumping off a cliff, nor would I go out of my way to be mean. I appreciate that dogs have become a treasured mammal among many humans – sometimes to the exclusion of all […]

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Salida’s Vandaveer Ranch

By Daniel Smith Photos by Mike Rosso From cattle ranch to golf course subdivision, center for natural resources to concert venue, on to citizen-driven development: WHAT’S AHEAD? Over the years, various visions for the 192-acre property have been floated by planners and city leaders. The former Vandaveer Ranch property on Salida’s eastern border has been a work in […]

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High Altitude Adventures with Corydon Rose

Born in New York in 1835, Rose had made his way to Colorado by 1873, where he took up mining in the majestic San Juan Mountains. He built his home in a gorgeous high-mountain meadow, roughly halfway between Ouray and Lake City. When entrepreneur Otto Mears built a toll road along Engineer’s Pass in 1877, […]

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The Way We Really Were

By Virginia McConnell Simmons April showers often brought more snow than May flowers for I-think-I-can narrow-gauge railroads. Winter blizzards and snow slides often upended estimated times of arrival, and in January 1884 a D&RG train was marooned for two weeks east of Cumbres Pass, while passengers cooked dwindling food and even washed clothes on the […]

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From the Editor: “Mediacracy”

By Mike Rosso I’m a full-time news junkie and part-time political junkie. You’d think this election season has been manna for a person like myself. Instead, I’m repulsed by the notion that I am even remotely associated with the formerly respected fourth estate. Not satisfied with their roles as reporters, the major media has abrogated […]

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About the Cover Photographer: Thomas Schultz

The cover photo was taken by Thomas Schultz on a cold day in November on his first trip to Creede, Colorado. Landscapes, urban exploration, ghost towns and abandoned buildings have always held a fascination for him. This photo was taken with a Canon EOS 5D camera with a Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS lens. The […]

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The Crowded Acre – The Grass is Always Greener …

By Jennifer Welch I never did fall in love with the idea of grazing our livestock on leased property 10 miles from the farm. The idea never sat well with me for a variety of reasons, the loftiest of which has been protection from predators. Our poultry are protected round-the-clock by a 140-pound livestock guard dog […]

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The Hilltop Mine – A Relic at 12,900 Feet

Story and photos by Maisie Ramsay High atop the wind-blasted saddle between Mount Sherman and Mount Sheridan sits the time capsule that is the Hilltop Mine. This is not the kind filled with trinkets and buried for future discovery – no, the Hilltop Mine is an accidental time capsule, a relic of times long past, […]

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Time is but the Stream …

By Hal Walter My life in fishing began, literally, because I could not be held in captivity, as evidenced by my escape from the daycare facility by digging a tunnel beneath the fence. The tunnel – inspired by episodes of the sitcom Hogan’s Heroes – was really not much more than a trench beneath the chain […]

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