Of Boomtimes Past: The Road to Wellsville

By Ron Sering Not much goes on these days in sparsely populated Wellsville, a few miles east of Salida, off U.S. Hwy 50. Home now to a couple of modest mining and milling operations and several private residences, the booms that had periodically rippled through the state have passed it by for many years. But […]

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About the Cover Photograph

On a visit to the Saguache County Museum last summer, we discovered this beautiful, hand-colored photograph of a young boy on his tricycle as part of their collection. Museum Director Dorraine Gasseling was kind enough to let us rephotograph it and use it as this month’s cover. The photo is of Saguache native, Jack Redhead, […]

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Longfellow Gulch

By Mike Rosso Okay – brief disclaimer: Longfellow Gulch, located just a few miles east of Salida, is not an easy spot to reach. First, you have to trespass on Union Pacific Railroad property, not a huge deal because it happens daily and year-round to access most of the new trails around Tenderfoot Mountain. Secondly, […]

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The Great Divide Mountain Bike Route

By Phillip Benningfield Imagine cursing a face full of persistent 25- mph wind, eating food like it was your last meal, being shocked by vistas beyond your expectations, and resting at an idyllic campsite. You’ll then have a very small taste of riding a bike along the Great Divide Mountain Bike Route. Throughout the quiet, […]

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Down on the Ground with the Working Land

Central Colorado lost a good friend and great heart and mind this winter – attorney Paul Snyder of Westcliffe. Among other things, Paul Snyder was a dedicated advocate for what might be called the “working landscape” in our mountain valleys. The ranchlands that are a “working landscape” because, first, they represent a long-standing foundation for […]

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Rail Writer Leaves a Legacy

By Ann Klaiman Author Doris Osterwald, best known for her guides to Colorado’s tourist trains, passed away March 27, 2014, two days before her 93rd birthday. In 1965, Osterwald published Cinders and Smoke, A Mile by Mile by Mile Guide for the Durango and Silverton Railroad, and it quickly set a standard for pleasing passengers […]

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Book Reviews

The Ogallala Road– A Memoir of Love and Reckoning By Julene Bair Viking, hardback, 278 pp, $26.95, ISBN-13: 978-0670786046 Reviewed by Annie Dawid On a boulder-strewn hill behind the cabin, pink barrel cactuses fended off would-be moochers with whorls of bright-pink spines, and in the gorge between that hill and the cabin, water trickled. The pools were […]

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Mini-Blessings Small Horses, Big Hearts

By Judy Epperson and Susan Shampine  It was apparent the boy was upset when he got off the school bus at Mini-Blessings. He went straight to the corner of the arena to be alone. While his eyes filled with tears, the young mare Aurora came over to him, put her muzzle over his shoulder and […]

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The Natural World

By Tina Mitchell Spring brings longer, warmer evenings that lure me outside after dinner. Once with our dogs on a postprandial stroll, I noticed the rustling of dried oak leaves. Do oaks grow in this area? Nope, no oaks anywhere near. Instead, a Prairie Rattlesnake sat coiled at the switchback we had all just walked […]

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News from the San Luis Valley

Adams State Under Heat The most affordable university in Colorado is under heat, facing pressure from news sources that have labeled it one of the least effective colleges in the United States. Payscale.com listed Adams State as one of the colleges with the worst ROI, or return on investment. The ROI is meant to represent […]

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Regional News Roundup

By Christopher Kolomitz Leadville Hospital gets $1M Grant In Leadville, a $1 million grant has been awarded to St. Vincent Hospital by the Colorado Department of Local Affairs. The money will be used for repairs on the heating and ventilation system, which will cost about $2 million. There are seven patient rooms without heat because […]

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Something Is Happening Here; Now Let’s Call It What It Is

By Martha Quillen Courtesy of Citizens United, there’s now a surfeit of cash fueling the spin, pander, deceptive advertising, resentment, indignation, and histrionics that characterize modern campaigning. But it’s not the money that’s driving Americans insane, it’s the inherent duality in our psyche. We regard ourselves as good and bad, right and wrong, Republicans versus […]

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Dispatch from the Edge

By Peter Anderson What I had in mind when I set out hitching home from Cortez one morning thirty some years ago, was making it back to a girlfriend’s house in Poncha Springs. Instead, I ended up in the Saguache County Jail. As the day began, I had every reason to believe I would ride […]

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What Matters is the Story

By Hal Walter “All writers are vain, selfish, and lazy, and at the very bottom of their motives there lies a mystery. Writing a book is a horrible, exhausting struggle, like a long bout of some painful illness. One would never undertake such a thing if one were not driven on by some demon whom […]

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The Tour Divide – Racing the Great Divide Route

By Mike Rosso The world’s longest off-pavement cycling route is host to an annual race, the Tour Divide. It involves climbing 200,000 total vertical feet (or summiting Mount Everest from sea-level seven times). It begins in Banff, Alberta, Canada and ends in Antelope Wells, New Mexico – 2,745 miles later. Last year, 143 riders began […]

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