About the Cover Artist: Laura Murphy

I grew up in a small town in the Texas Panhandle, where I spent a lot of time on the Canadian River with my dad and grandpa. We were always camping, artifact hunting and tromping around the hills and canyons that surround the river. I lived in that area until 2006, when I met my […]

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My Mount Princeton

By Richard R. Cuyler Up close, Mount Princeton is an ugly pile of granite; from a distance, it is beautiful in all its changeability of weather and seasons. At 71, should I have known better? Six of us, Princeton University alumni and friends, gathered for the annual climb up “our” eponymous mountain. Since it was […]

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LIGHTS OUT? The Clock is Ticking for Small Rural Movie Theaters

By Mike Rosso Movie theaters have been around in the U.S. since the late 1800s with the invention of the Vitascope projector by Thomas Edison. During the Great Depression, millions of Americans took refuge from economic woes in local theaters. Movie houses were big business for much of the 20th century. Then came television, allowing […]

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Down on the Ground in the Anthropocene

By George Sibley The Anthropocene: I’ve been thinking about this concept a lot, but nature and culture both kicked in recently with ugly news that both affirms and challenges the idea of an Anthropocene Epoch on planet earth. To refresh your mind (or assault it if the concept is new to you), “Anthropocene” is a […]

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A St. Patrick’s Day Parade … in September

By C.C. White Sometimes a town just needs a good excuse to party. Leadville – the self-proclaimed “Parade Capital of the U.S.” – certainly had yet another one this past September. Being too cold in March to formally observe St. Patrick’s Day, each September, at the halfway mark, the citizens hold what they call a […]

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Colorado Forts – Historic Outposts on the Wild Frontier

By Jolie Anderson Gallagher Editor’s note: The following excerpt is the first chapter from a new book: Colorado Forts, published by The History Press, Charleston, SC, ISBN #978.1.60949.660.9. Contested Borders (1806–1822) At the turn of the nineteenth century, the fledgling United States hungered for new territory. To the west of the Mississippi lay uncharted and […]

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Moving Salida Sideways

It’s the silly season in Salida. Lines in the sand are being drawn, ammunition is being stockpiled and talking points are being honed. We have three council seats as well as mayor’s seat up for grabs this November in Salida, and the philosophies of the candidates couldn’t be more stark. On one side we have […]

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Light on the Headstones

By Hal Walter As I was pulling away from the feed store, I noticed the early evening light on the headstones of the small cemetery on the hillside about a mile away. I’ve seen so many great photos of cemeteries in the Southwest, and had tried some photography in this graveyard a couple of times […]

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The Staff of Life – Part One: Free Gluten

By John Mattingly In places that sell and serve food these days, we see lots of GLUTEN-FREE signs. As an old wheat farmer, I want to make a sign that says FREE GLUTEN, like FREE TIBET, to encourage people to think a little differently about this. Many people have told me that they didn’t realize […]

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A St. Patrick’s Day Parade … in September

By C. C. White Sometimes a town just needs a good excuse to party. Leadville – the self-proclaimed “Parade Capital of the U.S.” – certainly had yet another one this past September. Being too cold in March to formally observe St. Patrick’s Day, each September, at the halfway mark, the citizens hold what they call […]

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A Tale of Two Cities Served by One Council

By Martha Quillen I’m an American, a Coloradan, a Salidan, and a resident of Chaffee County. I’m also a resident of a Colorado congressional district, a Salida city precinct, a hospital district and the R-32-J School District. As is true of most Americans, I am a citizen in a host of participatory democracies, which one […]

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Sustainability, Yet Another Fluid Curiosity

By John Mattingly Until recently, sustainability has been a foreign concept in the American West. Those who initially settled the West encountered a vast resource where everything was there for the taking: a settler could receive allodial title to land by homesteading, ranchers could freely graze the unfenced plains, and miners could dig a hole […]

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A Railroad That Missed the Flood

By Forrest Whitman When Gov. Hickenlooper visited Colorado Central county in Salida this summer, he took time out to view the old D. & R. G. W. Railroad main line. The last time a scheduled freight rolled by there was in 1997, but surprisingly we heard a horn blast. There it was, no mistaking, the […]

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Dispatch from the Edge

By Peter Anderson The vultures are leaving their roost over by the creek. They follow the Rio Grande south until the climate suits them. The sandhill cranes are flying in from the north, sometimes barely visible in the high skies as they circle, gather themselves and get their bearings; sometimes their weird cackling call precedes […]

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