Meet Doctor Robert

By Elliot Jackson For most of us, our first memory of “The Music” was mediated through the miracle of electronics, whether through the radio: 12 years old, rushing around getting ready for school, “I Want to Hold Your Hand” plays on the AM radio, stops me in my tracks, and I’m instantly in love – […]

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Micah’s Truth: Run Free!

By Hal Walter Although our trails had crossed numerous times over decades of mountain running, if it hadn’t been for the untimely departure of a close friend, I’d likely never have met the near mythical Micah True, aka Caballo Blanco, the central character of the New York Times bestseller “Born to Run.” Micah recently made […]

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The Fairview School

Story and photo by Eugene Blake One-room country schoolhouses and those who attended them are becoming rare. But one of these school buildings – Fairview School seven miles north of Gunnison – is again becoming a vital part of the historic Ohio Creek community. The school began in 1881 when local settlers established District 10 […]

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Dispatch from the Edge

By Peter Anderson Dear Griz, Old Route 66. The Mother Road on the eastern edge of Flagstaff. Near the Great Wall Chinese Buffet, Bubba’s Real Texas Barbecue, and Purple Sage Motel (American owned), we are sitting in the customer lounge of the Econolube. An oil change is rarely just an oil change for this old […]

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The Fryingpan-Arkansas River Project at 50

By George Sibley Part 2: The Quest for the Rational versus the Irrational and – Immortal? Lying astride the Continental Divide, Central Colorado has been a crossroads for some action and a lot more “discussion” concerning the state’s central problem: an arid region with 90 percent of its people on one side of the Divide, […]

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Letters to the Editor

Memories of the Alpine Tunnel To the Editor: To us, the Alpine Tunnel was always an illusionary magnet that drew our eyes and imagination to that lovely mountain. The story of the building and the courage, stamina and industry of its builders was the stuff of legends – an added attraction.

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Regional News Roundup

By Christopher Kolomitz Farewell Campy SALIDA – Laurence Campton, a well known Salidan, died April 13 at the age of 95. Known as “Campy” throughout the community, Campton moved to the area in 1949 and had just celebrated his 75th wedding anniversary with wife Daisy. He survived imprisonment during World War II, was the 1959 […]

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Book Reviews

Topic of Capricorn By John C. Mattingly Illustrations by Judith Penrose Mattingly Published in 2011 by Mirage Publishing ISBN 978-0-9710430-4-6 Reviewed by Ed Quillen There’s an old saying that “Goats can live on nothing and a man can live on goats.” Given that observation and the dismal income level of certain portions of Central Colorado, […]

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The Fading of a Legend: Doc Holliday in Leadville

By Charles F. Price On July 17, 1882, nine days after a visit to Salida – described in the April and May 2009 issues of Colorado Central – John H. (“Doc”) Holliday pulled into the town’s division yards on a DR&G train from Pueblo, headed for the silver camp of Leadville. This time he didn’t […]

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The Delectable Dandelion

By Doann Houghton-Alico What? You think there’s a typo in the headline? No, as it turns out, every bit of this plant is edible, and in France, certainly known as an international culinary center, they are grown as a commercial crop. In fact, the name is from the French dent de lion or lion’s tooth […]

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The Caboose

by Forrest Whitman Hobo News from Colorado Central County Spring nights bring the low, long moan of a freight crawling up the ruling grade. That sound makes solid citizens roll over in their sleep and remember some hobo dreams. When the nights get warm some of our readers vow to “by golly go rail ridin’.” […]

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Five Obscure Hikes (You may not know about)

By Phillip Benningfield Most of us, if fairly avid outdoors folks, have strolled along the Colorado Trail, the Continental Divide Trail and the easy-to-get-to trails surrounding our little mountain towns. What we miss by taking the well-trodden routes – although these aforementioned trails are superb – is the personal gratification we find when our minds […]

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Beginning “Tool Girl”

By Susan Tweit I’ve never claimed to be Tool Girl. Back in college, in fact, my housemates prohibited me from playing with their power tools when we were renovating our old house. As I recall, a small incident with a reciprocating saw and one of my fingers precipitated the ban. Both recovered, though the finger […]

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Writing

By John Mattingly When I started farming back in the late 1960s, I had a little time in the winter, during which I started writing. It became my hobby. A lot of farmers are able to pull a hobby out of their profession by fixing up antique tractors, or tinkering with various kinds of collections, […]

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