Eating may be more effective than voting

By Hal Walter My summer job is winding down, and, wow, has it been interesting, maybe even meaningful. Perhaps even important. I’ve working on a collection of articles, published in a series of three newsletters called “The Farm Beet,” about a group of independent farmers, all of them located on the banks of the Arkansas […]

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Down on the Ground with Small Steps in Big Stories

By George Sibley This year’s Headwaters Conference at Western State College posed an interesting topic. Entitled “Small Steps, Big Stories: Climate Solutions in the Headwaters,” the conference explored the challenge of developing positive, life-affirming “cultural stories” for addressing the big problems the society faces.

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Book Review

The Legend of Benjamin Ratcliff: From Family Tragedy to Legacy of Resilience by Chris O. Andrew Published in 2011 by the author ISBN 078-193266786-8 Reviewed by Ed Quillen It’s a safe bet that most family trees have some branches that nobody much wants to talk about, but few have a branch like this one. Benjamin […]

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Dispatch from the Edge

By Peter Anderson Eastbound clouds stall out over the high peaks of the Sangres. Others, low and gray, drape the big valley sky to the west. It is a restless season. I imagine the bears are on the move … such a fierce hunger before the big sleep, and the rose hips are ripe. A […]

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Quillen’s Corner

by Martha Quillen I’ve been reading about rational markets and the Efficient Markets Hypothesis recently. Well, actually I started reading about basic economics about fifteen years ago after I realized that there was something really crazy about small-town financial planning. And my overwhelming conclusion after fifteen years? Fiscal policy is screwy at every level. Community […]

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Not The Queen of Patience

By Susan Tweit As anyone who knows me knows very well, I am NOT the Queen of Patience. So on days like today, when Richard’s brain is just not working well, I have to remind myself that his company in my life is a gift. Which I do … As I turn out the lights […]

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Water Update

 by John Orr Summitville Clean Up It’s been nearly 20 years since the Environmental Protection Agency started cleanup efforts at the Summitville Mine. Runoff from the former open pit gold mine and its cyanide leach field was blamed for killing all aquatic life in the Alamosa River. In early September the Colorado Department of Public […]

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Regional News Roundup

Subdivision on the Auction Block BUENA VISTA – The Cottonwood Meadows Subdivision in Buena Vista is going on the auction block September 30. The subdivision has been plagued with problems since its conception by developer John Cogswell. The proposed 274-acre project called for 715 new residences and 110 acres of open space. Annexation of the […]

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Restorative Justice

Supporting Victims of Crime and Lowering Offender Recidivism By Patty LaTaille August 10, 2011 was an historic day for Restorative Justice in the state of Colorado. Restorative Justice House Bill 11-1032 went into effect, having been signed by Governor Hickenlooper earlier in July. This law requires that victims of crimes be informed of their right […]

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Just Say No? Opponents of ‘Over the River’ Speak Out

By Greg Felt and Ellen Bauder In 1992, Christo Javacheff had a vision. In it, he saw translucent polypropylene fabric panels suspended above a river as it flowed through a spectacular Western landscape. Studying maps, he considered several potential locations before settling on the Bighorn Sheep Canyon of the Arkansas. There he found soaring canyon […]

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News from the San Luis Valley

by Patty LaTaille Murderers Nabbed In Alamosa On May 6, 2011, Jerry Roberts of Arlington County, Texas, was reported missing. According to The Valley Courier, “Investigators found a bloody chair at Roberts’ home, and his refrigerator and truck were missing.” On July 4, “a man and his son were out in a rural part of […]

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All In

By John Mattingly Back in December 1975, an earnest fellow named Birch – a member of the Jehovah’s Witnesses – was kind enough to come to my farm to warn me of impending doom. He urged me to repent and prepare for the end of the world – The Rapture, on January 17, 1976. I […]

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“We Do”

By Jennifer Dempsey   This summer I was walking up F Street in Salida when I ran into Missy and Heather. I knew the women only slightly, had never had a real conversation with either, but that day they were radiating such happiness, I had to stop and say hello. “How are you gals?” I […]

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