Living in a Small Place in a Big Bad World

By Martha Quillen I used to love the feeling of isolation you could get in the Colorado Rockies. Forty-one years ago, Ed and I went camping in the Gunnison Country with friends. We pitched our tents right next to the road near Pitkin, and for several days we didn’t see a single car and couldn’t […]

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Down on the Ground: Across the Great Divide

By George Sibley Thirty-five water-user groups from both sides of the Continental Divide recently concluded a “Colorado River Cooperative Agreement” concerning the waters of the Upper Colorado River – both the water still in that river’s tributaries in Grand, Summit and Eagle Counties, and the water diverted out of those rivers into the South Platte […]

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News from the San Luis Valley

by Patty LaTaille When No Solar is a Good Thing Tessera Solar withdrew its bid to construct a 1,525-acre industrial solar power plant in Saguache County. For two years, residents and ranchers have fought the massive installation of 8,000 forty-foot hydrogen-fueled dish Stirling SunCatchers. According to the Pueblo Chieftain, “Tessera’s original proposal failed to meet […]

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REGIONAL NEWS ROUNDUP

One Brave Bear LEADVILLE – A 200-pound black bear wandered into a campground full of bow hunters and attacked a teenage boy in his tent on July 15. Thirteen-year-old Rick Voss was asleep at the Quail Mountain Recreation Area near Leadville when he was grabbed and bitten by the bear. Voss was camping as part […]

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For the Love of Single-Speeds

By Mike Rosso “One gear bikes have two speeds: riding and pushing.” – Anonymous I remember clearly my first bike. It had one gear. If you needed to climb a hill or gain momentum you stood up and pumped hard. Downhill you wound it out to the maximum RPM, slamming back hard on the pedals […]

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The Colorado Midland Railroad

By Virginia McConnell Simmons The economic potential of booming mining camps inspired the board of directors of Colorado Springs’ First National Bank to build a standard-gauge railroad through the Rockies. They believed they could provide the mountain region with better equipment and service than the region’s miniature railroads were already doing. The optimistic capitalists of […]

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Life in the Cancer Cloister

By Susan Tweit A friend who survived cancer said the treatment was like “living in a black hole,” in the sense that while the world goes on around you, and people are helpful and kind, you’re really isolated by the intense and exhausting journey you’re on. That’s how life feels right now. Even though we’re […]

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A Blast from the Past: Leadville’s Hopemore Mine Tour

By Lynda LaRocca If you really want to preserve the past, it helps to purchase part of it. Just ask Bob Calder. Calder owns the Hopemore Mine, which offers Leadville’s only guided walking tour of a hardrock or underground mine. Located at an 11,560-foot elevation in the city’s historic mining district, the Hopemore began operations […]

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Water Update

 by John Orr New hydroelectric generation plant online near Creede Humphreys family member Ruth Brown flipped the switch on the family’s new $1.3 million 310 kilowatt hydroelectric generation station on July 15. The new plant utilizes an existing 90 foot tall concrete arch dam and reservoir that Brown’s great grandfather built in 1923 below the […]

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World Class – Central Colorado Serves as the Starting Point for a Historic Bicycle Race

By Maddie Mansheim Sixteen teams totaling 128 professional bike riders will embark on a seven day feat of extraordinary physical ability, mental endurance and competitive ambition through a strenuous 518-mile trek traversing the demanding Coloradan terrain in the upcoming USA Pro Cycling Challenge (UPCC). This inaugural journey begins on Aug. 22 with the prologue in […]

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Precious Metals

By Jennifer Dempsey For Salida artist Tammy Grubisha, solving complicated engineering problems for custom orders was the easy part. Coming up with a name for her company was the hard part. “It was difficult naming my business because of all the things I do,” said the 44-year-old furniture maker/sculptor/welder/muralist. “I gave up trying to label […]

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Fees

By John Mattingly When my son graduated from high school, I shook his hand and attempted a parody from the 1967 Mike Nichols movie, The Graduate, in which Murray Hamilton takes Dustin Hoffman aside to say, “One word, Son … plastics.” I took my son aside, and placed a hand upon his shoulder with a […]

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From the Editor

Pedallers and Hackers This month’s cover art was provided by Nathrop-area photographer Taf McMurry. She made our job very difficult after providing dozens of great photos depicting all kinds of bicycles in a variety of artistic stylings. We decided we needed to run at least one more of her images in this issue so we […]

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The Maxwell Park School

– By Suzy Kelly, Buena Vista Heritage The cement block Maxwell Park School sits three miles south of Buena Vista on County Road 321. It was also sometimes known as the Mt. Princeton School. The school building was built of handmade cement blocks and you can see the hand and fingerprints in the blocks. The […]

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