From the Editor

Salida, Colorado is the highest, driest, coldest, windiest and probably, based on per capita income, the poorest place I’ve ever lived. So, how the heck did I end up here anyway? Partly it was because, unlike many other mountain communities in Colorado, I was actually able to afford to buy a house in town after […]

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Regional News Roundup

November 2010 Election Results Denver Mayor and brewpub owner John Hickenlooper beat out Republican Dan Maes and Tom Tancredo, who ran on the American Constitution Party ticket, to become the next governor of Colorado. Maes, a tea party favorite won only 11 percent of the vote, while Tancredo, who entered the race with an ultimatum […]

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Aerial view of Mt.Ouray and Mt. Chipeta, Colorado by Dan Downing.

The Costs of Altitude

By Ed Quillen If the United States had adopted the metric system in 1820, then Colorado’s highest country might be in better condition today with much less in the way of trail erosion, trampled tundra and disturbed wildlife. Why 1820? The metric system had been devised by the French Academy of Sciences in 1795, so […]

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The Divine Comedy: Post-modern Style

By Martha Quillen When Dante Alighieri produced his epic poem, “The Divine Comedy,” it was dubbed Dante’s “Commedia,” not because it was supposed to be funny, but because in medieval times a “comedy” was a story with a happy ending. Over the centuries, our definition of comedy expanded to include jokes, satire, and slapstick – […]

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Good Intentions

By Susan Tweit I think of this time of year as the contemplative season: the days are shorter and life slows down in preparation for winter. I haven’t had much reflective time lately, and I feel the lack of quiet, time to just be, to listen to the “small, still voice” of my spirit and […]

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News from the San Luis Valley

By Patty LaTaille Waste Not … Lawsuits have been filed against the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in regards to the transfer of nuclear waste in onto railroad cars in Antonito, within 100 yards from a tributary to the Rio Grande River. The Conejos County Clean Water, Inc., and San Luis Valley Ecosystem Council, along […]

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Book Review

Wild Burro Tales: Thirty Years of Haulin’ Ass By Hal Walter Out There Publishing, 2010 Reviewed by Teresa Cutler-Broyles “Hang on. Don’t let go.” So Hal Walter tells us in Wild Burro Tales, his wonderful new collection that takes us on a wild ride through the exciting and overlooked sport of pack-burro racing, and his […]

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Energy Matters: Financing your Solar Dream

by Dave Beaulieu When people learn that I work in the solar industry they like to pick my brain about the evolving technology. The conversation always gets around what it costs to go solar. I attribute this curiosity to the widespread media coverage of going “green” and a newfound awareness of the importance of energy […]

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Book Review

Historic Photos of  Heroes of the Old West Text and captions by Mike Cox Turner Publishing Company, 2010 ISBN: 9781596525689 Reviewed by Elliot Jackson The title of this handsome coffee-table book tells you almost everything you need to know about what you will find inside: yet for every photo of a traditional “hero” or villain […]

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Cleanup time at the Terrible Mine

By Hal Walter Local historians say Ilse (pronounced “Ill-see” or “Ill-seh”) was a bustling little community in the late 1800s and early 1900s, with a number of area residents ranching, farming as well as working at the Terrible Mine, where lead was extracted and milled. According to R.B. Brinsmade, a turn-of-the-century professor of mining engineering, […]

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Down on the Ground with the Zombieconomy

By George Sibley I’m writing in the wake of the election of 2010. Old stuff, you’re thinking, but be assured I am not going to spend much time there. The election strikes me as just one of those surface manifestations of something bigger going on – like the recent volcano-earthquake-tsunami in Indonesia reminds us that […]

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Snowshoe Racing; What are those people thinking?

by “Dr. Daddyo” They returned as they had left – in a fury. Snow flew from their oddly shod feet, grunts of semi-verbal communication noted both pain and pleasure as the multicolored herd rounded a final curve. It was a sight not likely to be forgotten. This mass of muscle, determination and sweat had finished […]

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Who Says We’re Lost?

by Scot Rasor Like a lot of men, I take great pride in my sense of direction when in the great outdoors. Whether hiking, camping or boating, consider me your go-to guy for getting back safe and sound. I often brag that you can place me in the middle of the woods, on the darkest […]

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Tales from the Road – Colorado home

by Mark Kneeskern Trains and coyotes echo in my thoughts this morning. They put me to sleep last night once I’d zipped myself off from the mosquitoes. Denver International Airport sent and received their minions on a trajectory over my bedroom, strangely silent, like vultures kettling home to roost.

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