Tales of a rat-hunting man

Column by Hal Walter Mountain Life – October 2005 – Colorado Central Magazine THERE’S A PACK RAT that’s been hanging around the house lately. And I’ve decided this rodent must go. I originally took a live-and-let-the-cat-take-care- of-it approach, figuring it was only a matter of time. After all, our cat lives pretty much on the […]

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Beetle-kill forests could become lynx habitat

Sidebar by Allen Best Wildlife – October 2005 – Colorado Central Magazine Reintroduced lynx have more commonly stayed south of Interstate 70. But the epidemic of pine beetles that is now causing large patches of rust-colored trees could become habitat for lynx in another 15 to 20 years. The question, theorizes Gary Patton, a former […]

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Lynx Recovery: 3 years of kittens

Article by Allen Best Wildlife – October 2005 – Colorado Central Magazine IN 1999, soon after Canada lynx were released into the San Juan Mountains, wildlife biologists were shocked to discover that four lynx had quickly starved to death. Public criticism was scornful. Colorado’s lynx recovery effort looked to many people like one giant miscalculation […]

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Jon MacManus mixes art and history

Review by Jayne Mabus Local Art – October 2005 – Colorado Central Magazine WHAT WOULD YOU DO if you sketched a drawing of a mountain, and a co-worker looked at it and blurted, “Man, what you doing here?” That was a great moment of epiphany for artist Jon MacManus. And the best part is that […]

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Not so distant disaster

Essay by Ed Quillen Natural Disaster – October 2005 – Colorado Central Magazine SOME DISTANT DISASTERS strike me harder than others, and New Orleans in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina has really hit hard. For several days as August ended and September began, instead of getting any productive work done, I was sneaking off to […]

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With taxes

Column by George Sibley Government – October 2005 – Colorado Central Magazine SO IS COLORADO’S REFERENDUM C a tax increase or not? Does TABOR give us “rebates” or “refunds”? A lot seems to ride on definitions in this election–but the truth is, your definitions probably follow from your politics, rather than determining them.

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Just prodding

Letter from Slim Wolfe Colorado Central – October 2005 – Colorado Central Magazine Editors: I love Boy Wonder on his rocking horse in South-Ark Funnies. And I’ve got a name for the horse: “Friend of the Devil.” In your replay to a previous letter in this space you doubt that our region can sustain much […]

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Telegraphic memories

Letter from Gene Lorig World War II – October 2005 – Colorado Central Magazine Dear Martha & Ed, Here is $40 for two more years. Next time I will be eighty. Does that mean a geezer rate?

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Becoming part of the art

Letter from Kenneth Jessen Christo – October 2005 – Colorado Central Magazine Editors: Doris Dembosky’s article (September, 2005, edition) about the “Over the River” project by Christo and his wife, Jeanne-Claude, begs the question what is art? After having completed 55 interviews with Loveland- area artists for my weekly column in the local newspaper, I […]

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In defense of La Veta

Letter from Ryus Coffee Club La Veta – October 2005 – Colorado Central Magazine Editors: This letter is in response to the letter from Mr. Daniel G. Jennings, published in the July 2005 edition of Colorado Central. While most of us agree that the average price of residential real estate seems to be spiraling out […]

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How Como got its name

Sidebar by Gary Minke Como Mines – October 2005 – Colorado Central Magazine The Alpine town of Como on Lake Como about 25 miles north of Milan, Italy, is in a picturesque setting. To the Italian miners who came to dig coal in Park County, their fast-growing railroad town nestled just below the Continental Divide […]

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The coal mines of South Park

Article by Gary Minke History – October 2005 – Colorado Central Magazine NINETEENTH-CENTURY MINING in Park County naturally kindles thoughts of gold and silver (and of the hard rock tunnels along Buckskin Gulch, and the big hydraulic washing operations which churned the riverbanks near Fairplay and Alma). But coal was also an important product during […]

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