Ten years of ‘true journalism’ in Central Colorado

Column by Hal Walter Colorado Central – December 2005 – Colorado Central Magazine I SUPPOSE AT THIS POINT it would be appropriate to mention that — with the writing of this piece — I will have completed 10 years of monthly columns for Colorado Central magazine. That’s 120 columns or essays, averaging 1,200 words or […]

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Homelands, Migration and Insecurity

Essay by Ed Quillen Migration – December 2005 – Colorado Central Magazine FOR MY BIRTHDAY a few years ago, one of my daughters gave me a T-shirt, which I wear — even though I believe there should be a federal law against transporting T-shirts that don’t have pockets across state lines, since a shirt pocket […]

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Scrimshander in the Valley

Article by Marcia Darnell Local Artists – December 2005 – Colorado Central Magazine WHAT DO YOU CALL a scrimshaw artist? A scrimshander. What do you call a scrimshander who specializes in elk antler? Tom High. High, a third-generation native of the San Luis Valley, grew up in Alamosa but hit the road after high school.

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Holiday favorites

Essay by Lynda La Rocca Books – December 2005 – Colorado Central Magazine I LOVE CHRISTMAS. Not the crowded malls filled with stressed-out shoppers and definitely not the hurriedness and commercialism associated with contemporary merrymaking. I love the spirit of Christmas. Frankly, what’s not to love about a holiday that, at its purest and best, […]

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Babbitt on the stump

Sidebar by Allen Best Cities in the Wilderness – December 2005 – Colorado Central Magazine Bruce Babbitt, the secretary of Interior in the Clinton administration, hopes to reframe the debate about federal intervention in the West – and the rest of the country. The federal government, he says, has been a relentless agent of development […]

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Lamentation for a deceased canine

Essay by Deric Pamp Mountain Life – December 2005 – Colorado Central Magazine We walk our dogs, most mornings, in one of several narrow canyons that drain the Arkansas Hills and run down to the flood plain, across the river from Salida. We get there by driving a rough county road that runs only a […]

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A roadside attraction in Moffat

Essay by John Mattingly Mountain Life – December 2005 – Colorado Central Magazine BREEZING THROUGH MOFFAT, you might see a Subaru with the bumper sticker IN GUAD WE TRUST parked next to a pickup truck with a .22 in the gunrack, or a BMW next to a VW, all sitting quietly under the circle sign, […]

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One big borderland

Letter from Slim Wolfe Migration – December 2005 – Colorado Central Magazine Dear Ed, I didn’t make it to the Headwaters Conference again, though I heard a half-hour’s worth of excerpts on the radio. I have the following afterthoughts about borderlands:

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Pleasure and disagreement

Letter from Eleanor Fry Colorado Central – December 2005 – Colorado Central Magazine Editors: I enjoy your magazine. I remove nearly all the historical articles and put them in the Pueblo County Historical Society vertical file.Your comments are generally too liberal for my taste, but I would defend to the death, etc. I happen to […]

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Kind words

Letter from Larae Essman Colorado Central – December 2005 – Colorado Central Magazine Editors: If I were not in such a slump because of the nomination of Scalito to the Supreme Court, I am sure I could compose an ode that would compliment you elegantly for writing and publishing your interesting, thought provoking, and amusing […]

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The day they close the pass

Essay by Steve Voynick Mountain Life – December 2005 – Colorado Central Magazine OLD-TIMERS STILL remember when winters in mountain towns meant something more than just catering to hordes of skiers. Sure, those winters were tough; the days were short and cold, and drifting snow restricted outdoor activities, and even closed some businesses and high […]

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Return to Earth Mountain

Article by Marty Rush Mountain Life – December 2005 – Colorado Central Magazine ON AUG.16, 2004, I quit my job in the communications department of a large HMO in Denver. A growing dissatisfaction with my life as a corporate mouthpiece had reached critical mass. I was horrified by what I’d become: a suburban commuter who […]

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