The commuter’s best friend

Column by Hal Walter Rural Life – April 2003 – Colorado Central Magazine IT IS BUT A VAGUE SUPERSTITION that life tomorrow will be anything like it is today. If you don’t think this is true, go read the book, or see the movie, Grapes of Wrath. It is perhaps the best documentary metaphor for […]

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Bazillions and bazillions

Column by George Sibley Government – April 2003 – Colorado Central Magazine A TRILLION. Two trillion. That’s the size, in dollars, of the budget proposed by another of those Presidents who was supposedly going to cut federal spending. Turns out he only meant to cut revenues; we just assumed that meant he would also be […]

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Projects threatened by cuts

Letter from Earle Kittleman Preservation – April 2003 – Colorado Central Magazine Editors: The state budget crisis is sending alarm signals throughout rural areas such as Salida where local historians are worried that funds may dry up to accomplish projects that are just now getting started.

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Archaic, not spooky

Letter from Slim Wolfe Review – April 2003 – Colorado Central Magazine Editors: Your editorial on the inadequacies of America brings me to an interesting point, the realization that our proposed war is neither about weapons or oil, but it is about an inferiority complex. Listen to the rhetoric from Washington. What I hear is […]

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Public enterprise hasn’t worked

Letter from Dave Skinner Political economy – April 2003 – Colorado Central Magazine Editors: George Sibley’s approach in “On the Ground” seems to be to socialize everything possible. As a “libertarian Republican,” I’ll try to refute him without resorting to “religious ideology.” To begin, one word explains why airline nationalization is wrong: AEROFLOT.

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It’s hard, but not that hard

Letter from Rex And Lavonne Ewing Review – April 2003 – Colorado Central Magazine Editors: We wanted to thank Kirby Perschbacher for the spirited and honest review of our book, Logs, Wind and Sun. As a builder, Kirby was able to offer a great deal of insight that would have been missing had the book […]

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In Fire’s Way, by Tom Wolf

Review by Ed Quillen Wildflire – April 2003 – Colorado Central Magazine In Fire’s Way – A Practical Guide to Life in the Wildfire Danger Zone by Tom Wolf Published in 2003 by University of New Mexico Press ISBN 0-8263-2096-1

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Shapes, Shades and Sounds: The art of Michael Chávez

Article by Lynda La Rocca Local Artists – April 2003 – Colorado Central Magazine WHEN ARTIST MICHAEL CHÁVEZ begins a new painting, he isn’t thinking about the finished product. In fact, he’s trying not to think about design or hue at all. Instead, Chàvez lets the creative process engulf him. And the result is canvasses […]

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The Silence of the Lands

Article by Allen Best Public Lands – April 2003 – Colorado Central Magazine FORMER MONTANA CONGRESSMAN Pat Williams was talking about Yellowstone National Park and snowmobiles, but he could have been talking about public lands anywhere. “Have you ever driven a snowmobile into Yellowstone’s wonders?” In many ways “it is a delight,” he said.

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Alamosa’s Billy Adams fought the Klan

Sidebar by Mike Feeley Ku Klux Klan – April 2003 – Colorado Central Magazine From the Opening Day remarks of Colorado State Senate Minority Leader Mike Feeley, January 7, 1998 There is another gentleman from Colorado that many of you have heard of, maybe some of you haven’t. His name is Billy Adams. He was […]

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Something that no one wants to talk about

Essay by Ed Quillen Ku Klux Klan – April 2003 – Colorado Central Magazine MY FATHER often commented, in the course of some discussion or another, that “back in the ’20s, the Klan pretty much ran Colorado.” When I was in college, a friend who grew up in Denver’s southern suburbs had discovered that the […]

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Skeletons in the family closet

Article by Orville Wright Ku Klux Klan – April 2003 – Colorado Central Magazine POLITICIANS ARE AFRAID of skeletons in the closet — especially around election time. No matter how squeaky clean a candidate claims to be, the opposition usually manages to dredge up dirt from some obscure location and proceed to start slinging mud. […]

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