Conservation easement is just another adventure

Column by Hal Walter Conservation – April 2002 – Colorado Central Magazine “Prepare to receive intense gamma radiation,” the figure on the aspen-lined trail calls out from ahead. “We’re coming up on the richest vein of thorium in the nation.” My first instinct is to hold my breath. But as I look into the pit, […]

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A second helping of ‘Poetry on a Platter’

Article by Lynda La Rocca Poetry – April 2002 – Colorado Central Magazine IT PROMISES to be a feast that will leave everyone hungry for more. The second annual “Poetry on a Platter” festival is coming to Salida April 8-10. The first stop on a six-day poetic journey that continues in Montrose before concluding in […]

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This is good news – more or less

Essay by Martha Quillen Local life – April 2002 – Colorado Central Magazine IT’S THE FIRST WEEK OF MARCH as I write this, and it’s freezing outside — and in. For the first time since Ed and I moved into this house more than twelve years ago, our pipes are frozen. At the same time, […]

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From discards to art: Kay Litz of Salida

Article by Sue Snively Local artist – April 2002 – Colorado Central Magazine IT IS CALLED “Prayer Shawl” and it hangs in the sunlight at Gallery K on F Street in Salida. Framed in a bed-spring hung to look like a shawl, are 12 small sculptured figures of a sad, young woman. Tiny discarded feathers […]

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Courage is the true currency

Letter from David Hester War on Terror – April 2002 – Colorado Central Magazine Hi, Mr. Ed, Two letters I especially liked were from Slim Wolfe of Villa Grove and Dick Conway, WA who gave insight into why our nation was attacked. It would seem that Washington would wonder why 1/3 of the world hates […]

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It’s not that hard

Letter from John Doe Math – April 2002 – Colorado Central Magazine Dear Editor: I was in about the ninth grade when I took a class in typing. We were told to do a;sldkfjghfjdksla; to strengthen our hands and I did a lot of it. We were farmers and short of typewriters at home so […]

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More thoughts on the war

Letter from Slim Wolfe War on terror – April 2002 – Colorado Central Magazine Editors: I’d like to see bin Laden hung from the nearest tree, but at least as much, I’d like to see Bush hanging there as well. Note an armload of similarities to Hitler. Note the need to be military commander. (What […]

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About the magazine … and the war

Letter from Stu Krebs War on terror – April 2002 – Colorado Central Magazine About the magazine… Dear Ed and Martha, I enjoy Colorado Central every time, and what’s more, usually read most of it. I’ve found the more extensive coverage of things like public lands issues especially interesting. George Sibley is always good, too, […]

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Creative cartography?

Letter from Kenneth Jessen Colorado history – April 2002 – Colorado Central Magazine Creative cartography? Editors: Buyer Beware: The much touted 1894 map of Colorado, originally published by the Caxton Company, was just too good to be true. It has many long forgotten places, and added an amazing amount of information on long abandoned Colorado […]

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Some ski reading

Sidebar by Bob Berwyn Recreation – April 2002 – Colorado Central Magazine Skiing is really an experiential kind of thing, much more fun to do than just read about. But it seems that many skiers have taken advantage of the non-snow season to put pen to paper, creating an extensive collection of books about every […]

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‘Pinheads’ are a major market at Monarch

Sidebar by Ed Quillen Recreation – April 2002 – Colorado Central Magazine The resurgence of cross-country skiing in the early 1970s brought telemarkers to the alpine slopes of the Monarch Resort. Although there were a few problems, it was generally a smooth process, according to Jack Watkins of Poncha Springs, the general manager then.

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Telemark turn moves into the mainstream

Article by Bob Berwyn Recreation – April 2002 – Colorado Central Magazine NON-SKIERS MAY NOT KNOW — or even care — that skiers can use different techniques to make turns down a mountain. For those outside the sport, the difference might be less significant than the difference between a one-hump camel and a two-hump camel.

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